• National Students as Partners Roundtable (9 October 2017)

    Students as Partners Event at The University of Adelaide on 9 October 2017 

    Students as Partners is about harnessing student and staff creativity via collaborative partnerships to enhance teaching and learning.

    UQ hosted the inaugural National Students as Partners Roundtable in 2015 and the 2nd Annual event in 2016. The 2017 National Students as Partners Roundtable The 2017 National Students as Partners Roundtable at The University of Adelaide further developed the conversation by bringing together students, academics, and professional staff from across Australia to explore the role of students as partners in; learning and teaching governance; learning and research; curriculum development and review; learning and teaching enhancement; peer support. The Roundtable covered developments in student-staff partnership in Australia, what it looks like in practice, challenges to the concept, and stories from those involved.

    • Share Students as Partners practices, ideas, and experiences
    • Discover new ways of considering Students as Partners in higher education
    • Network with a diversity of Students as Partners practitioners ​
    • Harness the creativity of staff and students to address teaching and learning challenges

    Registration and details here: https://www.adelaide.edu.au/learning/students-as-partners/ 

  • Talks: ISSOTL Conference (October 2017)

    Students as Partners Panels + Presentations at the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Conference (ISSoTL) in Calgary, Canada: 11-14 October

    The adventures of engaging as partners: Exploring the literature to discover outcomes and reveal barriers

    Paper Presentation: Sam Lucie Dvorakova (University of Queensland, Australia), Kelly E Matthews (University of Queensland, Australia), Mick Healey (Healey Consultants, UK), Anita Acai (McMaster University, Canada), Alison Cook-Sather (Bryn Mawr, USA), Peter Felten (Elon University, USA), Ruth Healey (University of Chester, UK), Elizabeth Marquis (McMaster University, Canada), Lucy Mercer-Mapstone (University of Queensland, Australia)

    Engaging students and faculty in a summer institute on students as partners

    Paper Presentation: Mick Healey (Healey HE Consultants, UK), Beth Marquis (McMaster, Canada), Kelly Matthews (Queensland, Australia), Christine Black (McMaster, Canada), Sam Dvorakova (Queensland, Australia), and Rachel Guitman (McMaster, Canada) )

    Dates, times, venues can be found in the program on the conference website.

     

  • Public Seminar: Professor Mick Healey (October 2016)

    Designing and integrating research and inquiry activities into the curriculum

    This interactive workshop aims to explore practical ways of designing and incorporating research and inquiry activities into courses. It includes discussion of the issues academics and students face in this mode of learning. It will be relevant to academics and students who would like to explore the integration of research and inquiry based learning into the curriculum. Participants will leave this workshop with practical ways in which they can incorporate research and inquiry activities into their courses whether it is a short activity in class, a whole session, or the whole course. The interactive session will explore the variety of ways in which undergraduate research and inquiry based learning can stimulate learning development from first to final year using mini-case studies from different courses in Europe, Australasia, and North America.

    Date: Friday 7 October 2016
    Time:12pm - 2pm
    Venue:Room 212 Prentice Building (42), The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane
    Register: HERE

    Read more Mick and download the flyer here.

  • Public Seminar: Professor Alison Cook-Sather (October 2016)

    Respect, Reciprocity, and shared responsibility in context: How to build a student-academic pedagogical partnership program in your institution

    Ways of engaging students in higher education as partners in learning and teaching is arguably one of the most important issues facing higher education in the 21st Century. Partnership is essentially a process for engaging students, though not all engagement involves partnership. It is a way of doing things, rather than an outcome in itself. This interactive session will explore four ways in which students may be engaged as partners through: a) Learning, teaching and assessment; b) Subject-based research and inquiry; c) Scholarship of teaching and learning; and d) Curriculum design and pedagogic advice and consultancy. Particular attention will be paid to how we may build on and move beyond listening to the student voice and involve students as change agents who can have an impact on the teaching and learning that they and their fellow students experience, through mentoring staff, co-researching teaching and learning, and co-designing the curriculum. It will draw on numerous case studies from Europe, North America and Australasia.

    Date: Thursday 6 October 2016
    Time: 10am - 12pm
    Venue: Room 217 Sir Llew Edwards Building (14), The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane

    Register: HERE

    Read more Alison and download the flyer here.

  • National Students as Partners Roundtable (October 2016 - slides posted)

    Students as Partners Event at The University of Queensland on 5 October 2016 attended by over 100 people - students, professional and academic staff - from 23 universities. Storify of the twitter feed from the day gives sense of the event. Two blog posts from Colin Simpson and Sarah O'Shea offer deeper reflections. The slides for the day are available - due to large file size, email Kelly on k.matthews1@uq.edu.au if you would like a copy. 

    Students as Partners is about harnessing student and staff creativity via collaborative partnerships to enhance teaching and learning.

    UQ hosted the inaugural National Students as Partners Roundtable in 2015. The 2016 National Students as Partners Roundtable will bring together students, academics, and professional staff from across Australia to explore this innovative model for teaching and learning enhancement. Featuring international experts in interactive workshops, the Roundtable will cover developments in student-staff partnership in Australia, what it looks like in practice, challenges to the concept, and stories from those involved.

    • Share Students as Partners practices, ideas, and experiences
    • Discover new ways of considering Students as Partners in higher education
    • Network with a diversity of Students as Partners practitioners ​
    • Harness the creativity of staff and students to address teaching and learning challenges

    Speakers at the 2016 National Students as Partners Roundtable will facilitate interactive sessions and include both students and academics active in student-staff partnerships. 

    Registration is required, will be limited to enable genuine interactions, includes lunch and catered tea breaks, and is free. Students and staff are encouraged to attend. 

    Guests from across Australian and overseas are welcome to attend with accommodation information available

  • Transforming Practice Program (TPP): Showcase Day (October 2016 - slides posted)

    Engaging students as partners in curriculum design and course transformation​ workshop attended by 30 staff from across Queensland. Slides here. 

    Led by Ms Caroline Rueckert in collaboration with Kelly Mathews [UQ], Ms Lucy Mercer-Mapstone [UQ], Ms Sarah Winter [QUT], Ms Rachel Ward [QUT], Ms Natasha Shaw [QUT]

    Recent research on student success has increasingly called for new approaches to engage students more deeply in their learning (Baker & Griffin, Kuh, Kinzie, Shuh & Whitt, 2010). Engagement has been recognized as a core aspect of higher education (Harper & Quaye, 2010), and there has been considerable attention given to developing strategies to support students to take responsibility for their learning (Cook-Sather & Luz, 2014), as well as the importance of student voice and the unique role that students might play in shaping and advancing their learning environments (Cook-Sather, 2014). However, research has also shown that, despite the evidence of the importance of student voice (Cook-Sather, 2010), it is frequently overlooked in curriculum design and course transformation (Bovill et al., 2011). In 2015, QUT piloted a Student as Partners Curriculum Scheme that engaged 42 students and 18 academic staff from across four faculties in collaborative partnerships with academic staff to re-imagine aspects of curriculum design and assessment. Using a participatory action research approach, the scheme focused on six indicators of student success and sought to explore how a “student as partner” approach might impact student success, as well as student and staff perceptions of, and engagement with, learning and teaching. In this paper, I present the findings of this initial pilot, provide an overview of the scheme design and methodology, and share the recommendations that emerged from the pilots

  • Queensland Universities Education Showcase (QUES): Workshop (September 2016 - slides posted)

    Transforming Practice Program in 2016 presented on Sustaining Students as Partners attended by representatives from 11 Australian universities. Slides are here

    'Showcase Day' on 4 October is hosted at UQ. All team members from the participating universities will present their student as partners change initiatives. TPP leader Patrick Crookes will lead a morning session enabling teams to share their projects and progress. Special guests Alison Cook-Sather and Mick Healey will offer guidance to teams in an afternoon Q&A session. Kelly Matthews will discuss how student-staff partnerships can be sustained nationally. 

  • Special Issue: 'Students as Partners in Australia'  (Published)

    Special issue published

    Teaching and Learning Together in Higher Education (TLTHE) serves as a forum for the reflective work of university academics, staff and students working together to explore and enact effective classroom practice. Published three times per year, the journal is premised on the centrality to successful pedagogy of dialogue and collaboration among staff and students in explorations and revisions of approaches to teaching and learning in higher education. The journal has several aims:

    • To include student perspectives and voices in analyses, affirmations, and revisions of educational practice at the tertiary level.
    • To offer windows into the development of pedagogical insights that academic and students gain when they collaborate on explorations of classroom practice and systematically reflect on that collaboration.
    • To create forums for dialogue between staff and students whose work is featured in this journal and others engaged in similar work.
    • To explore in particular the challenges and possibilities of such collaborations

    Special Issue: Australian Stories of Partnership

    Contributions exploring the possibilities of ‘students as partners’ in Australian higher education are invited - essays by staff (professional, academic or hybrid) and students seeking to reshape Australian higher education through dialogue and collaboration amongst staff and students. The guest editor is Kelly Matthews, Senior Lecturer in Higher Education at The University of Queensland, and an Australian National Learning and Teaching Fellow.

    Publication Date: January 2017

    Submission Date: By 1 September 2016 to Kelly Matthews k.matthews1@uq.edu.au with subject line 'special issue'

    Guidelines: The following are guidelines for essays submitted to TLTHE including ‘Australian Stories’ special issue. 

    LENGTH: Most issues include between 4 and 10 essays, and each essay is between 3 and 10 pages.

    STYLE: Essays should be written in an informal/conversational style, using first person pronouns, and be (very) light on citations. The idea is to provide a forum for in-process work, exploration, experimentation, and reflection.

    STRUCTURE OF ESSAYS: Contributors might consider structuring their essays in the following way (this is just a suggestion, not a requirement):

    • Identify the question, challenge, inspiration, or other issue that prompted you to undertake the partnership
    • Describe the approach you took to engaging actively as partners
    • Reflect on how this approach moves you (further) toward partnership overall
    • Imagine/propose some next steps that would take you (even) further toward partnership

    FOCUS: All essays should focus on partnership—on academic/staff and students working together—but partnership can be broadly defined:

    • an academic member reflecting on focused work with a student consultant
    • a discussion between an academic member and students who have co-designed some element of a course (a project or an assignment, for instance) while the students are enrolled
    • the analysis offered by an academic member, a group of academics, or teaching and learning centre staff focused on the process of co-planning a program or a course with students
    • students’ reflections on their experiences of pedagogical partnerships
    • or other possibilities

    AUTHORSHIP: Essays can be co-authored (academic/staff member[s] and student[s]), or faculty/staff and students can write separate essays about their work in partnership.

    Submission queries: Contact Kelly Matthews on 07 3365 1169 or k.matthews1@uq.edu.

  • Invited Keynote: Blackboard Forum (August 2016 - slides posted)

    Invited Keynote: Students as Co-creators of their Learning Experience at the Blackboard Forum in Sydney: 25 August 2016. Attended by 15 university leaders and staff from Blackboard. Slides are here.

    Engaging students as partners harnesses the creativity of students and staff to shape modern higher education through genuine collaborative relationships. Join Kelly, an Australian National Teaching Fellow, as she challenges the conventional roles of students as passive educational consumers and offers new insights into students as co-creators of learning experiences.

  • Invited Talk: University of Canberra (August 2016 - slides posted)

    Engaging students as partners to shape university teaching and learning on Tuesday 16 August

    Invited Talk: Student-Staff Partnerships to Shape Higher Education. Attended by 20 people from University of Canberra and Australian National University. Slides including links to hand-outs (hyperlinked on title slide) are here.

    Future leaders who thrive in the face of uncertainty; agile and able to generate new ideas and solutions to problems we can't yet imagine; innovative thinkers - this is the calibre of graduates to which universities aspire. Students rarely get opportunities to take leadership in their own learning within their degree programmes. Students as partners is a way of thinking that positions students as change agents who share responsibility for learning and teaching with university staff – going beyond student engagement that fosters active learning.

    Students as Partners shifts students from learning from to learning with academics at the forefront of knowledge creation and teaching innovations. This workshop will engage participants in discussions about students as partners: definitions, motivations, current practices, and emerging research. Stories of student-staff partnership already happening at University of Canberra will be shared. Models will be presented to prompt conversation about the outcomes, barriers and opportunities of student-staff partnership approaches at unit of study, degree programme and institutional levels. Participants will leave with new insights into ways of thinking and talking about student-staff partnerships; ideas about implementing students as partners initiatives; and a sense of existing partnership efforts.

    Invited Workshop: Action Planning Session. Attended by 8 people from University of Canberra and Australian National University. Slides including links to hand-outs (hyperlinked on title slide) are here.

    This planning session will identify existing efforts in this space and extend them, where appropriate whilst also creating space for new ideas. It will involve small groups developing ideas for: what students as partners initiatives could look like at University of Canberra at the course, program and institutional levels; how it could be implemented in the short and medium-term; what enablers are required for such initiatives to be implemented how evidence of effectiveness will be captured

  • Invited Talk: ACDS Teaching & Learning Conference (July 2016 - slides posted)

    Australian Council of Deans of Science (ACDS) at The University of Sydney: 22 July 2016. Attended by 50 leaders in university science education plus five Australian learning and teaching fellows. Slides here

    Talk on Student voice in curriculum review facilitated by Kelly Matthews

    The annual Leadership in Teaching & Learning Conference hosted by the Australian Council of Deans of Science (ACDS) is an annual gathering of Australian university science curriculum leaders. Moving beyond students as a source of data to inform science curriculum reviews, this talk challenged science leaders to consider how students could become more active and genuine contributors in the such reviews. The idea of 'students as partners' was introduced. Arguments for the benefits of involving students were discussed along with four examples of how students have been involved in science curriculum development. Challenges and obstacles were raised followed by problem-solving strategies. 

  • Invited Talk: UQ Student Leaders Conference (July 2016 - slides/feedback posted)

    UQ Student Leaders Conference at The University of Queensland: 12 July 2016. Attended by 60 UQ students. Slides here. Feedback from students via infogram

    Joint workshop on Engaging UQ Students as Partners facilitated by Kelly Matthews and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone

    The Inaugural UQ Union Student Leaders Conference will provide the top 100 Student Leaders from The University of Queensland with professional development and start a dialogue about the future directions of student experience at UQ and to provide strategic direction to the Union. A key focus of the conference is on the relationship between UQ and students. The "Engaging UQ Students as Partners" workshop will define what we mean by the idea of partnerships, offer a platform to share experiences, and invite students to shape the development of two new UQ partnership programs. Ways for UQ students to become partners on UQ's plans for 'students as partners" will be discussed.

  • Point for Debate: HERDSA Conference (July 2016 - slides/summary posted)

    ‘Students as Partners’ in Higher Education: An insurmountable challenge or an opportunity for transformation? Attended by approximately 40 conference participants. Slides are here. 

    Tuesday 5 July at 12.15pm

    Collaborative effort led by Lucy Mercer-Mapstone (University of Queensland) with Kelly Matthews (University of Queensland), Caroline Rueckert (Queensland University of Technology), Lisa Thomas (University of Wollongong), and Sally Varnham (University of Technology Sydney).

    ‘Students as Partners’ (SaP) initiatives can enact change to enhance student learning alongside academic teaching by leveraging shared engagement between students and academics seeking to learn together (Healy, Flint, & Harrington 2014). Such initiatives, however, challenge the traditional top-down hierarchy of the teacher/student relationship and have the potential to threaten the deeply-entrenched ‘academic’ identity by questioning who has the power to create knowledge in higher education (Cook-Sather, Bovill, & Felten 2014). With such challenges on the horizon this paradox begs the question: How can students partner with academics to shape teaching and learning in higher education in a way that is truly transformational for both parties?

    This point of debate session will begin to address this vital question by drawing on the ‘lived experiences’ of four staff from a range of backgrounds, disciplines and universities. Each of these university staff are currently exploring different facets of the above challenge in an effort to move toward translating SaP rhetoric into sustainable practice. During this session, concurrent roundtable discussions will be facilitated by each academic on the following themes:

    1. Inclusion of students and staff from under-represented backgrounds
    2. Language of ‘students as partners’ and communicating across contexts
    3. Representation of students in higher education decision-making and governance – developing a culture of partnership by systemic engagement from course representation and beyond
    4. Capacity-building and support for staff and students in implementing partnerships

    Following lively debate at each table, summary points will be discussed amongst all participants. The overall session will be facilitated by a PhD student and early career researcher active in student-academic partnerships and research. By drawing on the experiences of the academic facilitators, student facilitator, and conference delegates this point of debate hopes to address these issues that are central to the future of student partnerships and to advancing our understanding of higher education.

    References

    Cook-Sather, A., Bovill, C. and Felten, P. (2014). Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series. John Wiley & Sons.

    Healey, M., Flint, A., & Harrington, K. (2014). Engagement through partnership: students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education. London, Higher Education Academy. Available from: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/engagement-through-partnership-students-partners-learning-and-teaching-higher-education 

    Below is a summary of the discussion drafted by Kelly Matthews.

    Several threads of discussions arose from the question, how can we talk about 'students as partners' to our colleagues, across disciplines, and to senior administrators to further partnership practices? Grounded in the language of ‘students as partners’, a key theme centred on contextualising the idea of ‘students as partners’ to suit the discipline and institutional contexts. The newness of the term ‘students as partners’ in Australia, being written in some institutional policies already, means time is needed to develop local understanding and shared meaning. Cynical views were expressed linked to (1) constant churn of policies with little meaning, and (2) insincerity of institutional leaders when they refer to ‘partnerships’ with anyone in the university community. Nonetheless, folks could see how some current practices were actually within the realm of ‘students as partners’, signalling the viability of such approaches. A final thread was the actual language of ‘students as partners’ with an emphasis on using terminology that resonated with colleagues, which might not be ‘students as partners' per se. For example, ‘belonging’ and ‘shared responsibility for teaching and learning’ were being used at some universities as alternative phasing.

  • Invited Talk: Western Australian Network for Dissemination (July 2016 - slides/feedback posted)

    Engaging Students as Partners to shape higher educationAttended by 20 students and staff from Murdoch, Western Australia, and Notre Dame. Slides here. Feedback from attendees presented via inforgram.

    Joint presentation facilitated by Kelly Matthews and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone

    Future leaders who thrive in the face of uncertainty; agile and able to generate new ideas and solutions to problems we can’t yet imagine; innovative thinkers - this is the calibre of graduates to which universities aspire. Students rarely get opportunities to take leadership in their own learning within their degree programmes. Students as partners is a way of thinking that positions students as change agents who share responsibility for learning and teaching with university staff – going beyond student engagement that fosters active learning. Students as Partners shifts students from learning from to learning with academics at the forefront of knowledge creation and teaching innovations. This workshop will engage participants in discussions about students as partners: definitions, motivations, current practices, and emerging research. Stories of student-staff partnership already happening at Murdoch will be shared. Models will be presented to prompt conversation about the outcomes, barriers and opportunities of student-staff partnership approaches at unit of study, degree programme and institutional levels. Participants will leave with new insights into ways of thinking and talking about student-staff partnerships; ideas about implementing students as partners initiatives; and a sense of existing partnership efforts happening locally, nationally and internationally. 

  • Invited Facilitator: International Summer Institute on Students as Partners (May 2016 - slides/resources posted)

    International Summer Institute on ‘Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

    The first International Summer Institute on ‘Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education’ was organised by McMaster Institute for Innovation and Enhancement in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL), Canada in May 2016. The Institute included two-day workshops and a Change Institute model. 

    Kelly Matthews with UQ students Lauren, Lucy and Sam facilitated two workshops:

    Students as Partners in Subject Based Research and Inquiry 

    Students as Partners in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)

    For more information see: https://macblog.mcmaster.ca/summer-institute

    The Summer Institute is facilitated by highly experienced faculty and students including Peter Felten (Elon, US), Mick Healey (Healey HE Consultants, UK), Beth Marquis (McMaster, Canada), Kelly Matthews (Queensland, Australia), Lauren Groenenijk (student from University of Queensland), Lucy Mercer-Mapstone (student from University of Queensland), and Sam Dvorakova (student from University of Queensland).

  • Invited Talk: University of New South Wales (April 2016 - slides/resources posted)

    Exploring Students as Partners at UNSW Symposium on Thursday 7 April 

    Research-intensive universities aspire to graduate students as future leaders who thrive in the face of uncertainty; they are agile and able to generate new ideas and solutions to problems we can’t yet imagine; true innovative thinkers. Yet within our degree programs, students rarely get opportunities to assume leadership of their own learning. Students as partners is a way of thinking that positions students as change agents who share responsibility for learning and teaching with university staff. It extends beyond student engagement that fosters active learning; it shifts students from a position of learning from to learning with academics. This enables students to be partners in the creation of knowledge and development of teaching innovations. This symposium provides the opportunity for staff and students to engage with core ideas Students as Partners and to consider how this connects with the future directions of UNSW. The morning session focuses on exploring current thinking and practice related to Students as Partners to consider how this might align with the UNSW 2025 Strategy. The afternoon session is an action-planning session for those who wish to develop their ideas or projects more fully.

    Invited Talk: Student-Staff Partnerships to Shape Higher Education. Attended by just over 100 staff and students. Slides here. Case studies handout here. 

    This session engages participants in discussion about students as partners.  It considers definitions, motivations, current practices, and emerging research. Models are presented to prompt conversations about outcomes, barriers and opportunities of student-staff partnerships.  These will be explored across different levels from courses, programs through to institutional levels. The emphasis is on students-staff partnerships in curriculum development and pedagogic consultation.

    Invited Workshop: Action Planning Session. Attended by 42 staff and students. Slides here. Action planning template here. 

    This planning session will identify existing efforts in this space and extend them, where appropriate whilst also creating space for new ideas. It will involve small groups developing ideas for:

    • what students as partners initiatives could look like at UNSW at the course, program and institutional levels
    • how it could be implemented in the short and medium-term
    • what enablers are required for such initiatives to be implemented
    • how evidence of effectiveness will be captured
  • Transforming Practice Program (TPP): Residential Days (April 2016 - slides/resources posted)

    Transforming Practice Program in 2016: Students as Partners

    'Two-day Residential' was hosted on 4-5 April by UQ and was attended by 57 people representing 11 participating universities. View agenda. View slides.

    All team members spent two day working on their students as partners projects with activities facilitated by Patrick Crookes, Steve Outram and Kelly Matthews. Resources used included:

    1. The TPP Toolkit was a central resource used across the two-days. 
    2. Report on Dialogic Organisational Development from the Royal Shakespeare Company
  • Transforming Practice Program (TPP): Start-up Day (February 2016 - slides/resources posted)

    Transforming Practice Program in 2016: Students as Partners

    'Start-up Day' was hosted on Friday 26 February by UQ and was attended by 25 people representing 11 participating universities. View agenda

    Patrick Crookes led sessions on essential elements of change. View slides

    Kelly Matthews and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone facilitated a session, Students as Partners: Research + Practice, and pointed participants to three essential resources:

    1. Healey et al Engagement through Partnership Report featuring literature review, examples and models
    2. Healey case studies on 'students as partners and change agents' that can be downloaded from his website
    3. Matthews case studies on 'students as partners' that can be found on this website

    Dominique Parrish presented on project management and evaluation. View slides, action plan template, evaluation logic example.

  • Public Seminar: Professor Peter Felten (October 2015 - notes/video posted)

    Engaging seminar with 55 attendees. Peter's talk in 5-minutes is here. Notes from his talk are here.

    STUDENTS AS PARTNERS: WHAT DO WE KNOW?

    Typically academics teach to students. What happens if we approach our work differently, aiming to teach with students? Emerging research suggests that engaging students as partners in university teaching and learning has the potential to enhance, and perhaps even transform, student learning – and also the teaching we do as academics.

    This seminar will explore the philosophy and practices of partnership, as well as the research on the topic. The seminar will emphasize the outcomes and the challenges academics can anticipate when they partner with students in learning and teaching. 

    Date                    Thursday, 22 October 2015
    Time                   10.00am followed by Open Discussion at 11.00am
    Venue                 10am Seminar in Room 313a, Advanced Engineering Building (49), (St Lucia)
                                11am Open Discussion in Room 202a, Learning Innovation Building (17), (St. Lucia)
    Register              HERE

     

    PETER FELTEN

    Peter is Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Executive Director of the Center for Engaged Learning, and Professor of History at Elon University, in the United States. His recent publications include the co-authored books Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching (Jossey-Bass, 2014) and Transforming Students: Fulfilling the Promise of Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014). He is president-elect of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and a co-editor of the International Journal for Academic Development. 

    • Public Seminar: Professor Mick Healey (October 2015 - notes/resources posted)

      Engaging seminar with 95 attendees. Notes on his talk are here. Resouces from Mick here.

      Engaging Students as Partners and as Change Agents

      Ways of engaging students in higher education as partners in learning and teaching is arguably one of the most important issues facing higher education in the 21st Century. Partnership is essentially a process for engaging students, though not all engagement involves partnership. It is a way of doing things, rather than an outcome in itself. This interactive session will explore four ways in which students may be engaged as partners through: a) Learning, teaching and assessment; b) Subject-based research and inquiry; c) Scholarship of teaching and learning; and d) Curriculum design and pedagogic advice and consultancy. Particular attention will be paid to how we may build on and move beyond listening to the student voice and involve students as change agents who can have an impact on the teaching and learning that they and their fellow students experience, through mentoring staff, co-researching teaching and learning, and co-designing the curriculum. It will draw on numerous case studies from Europe, North America and Australasia.

      Date: Friday, 23 October 2015
      Time: 10.00am Seminar followed by Workshop at 11.00am
      Venue: CHANGE OF VENUE. Now in Room 202, Learning Innovation Building (LIB) Building 17
      Register: HERE

      Mick Healey is a Higher Education Consultant and Researcher and Emeritus Professor at the University of Gloucestershire, UK. Until 2010 he was Director of the Centre for Active Learning, a nationally funded Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Gloucestershire. He is also a Visiting Professor at UCL, UK; The Humboldt Distinguished Scholar in Research-Based Learning at McMaster University, Canada; an adjunct Professor at Macquarie University, Australia; an International Teaching Fellow at University College Cork; and a Visiting Fellow at University of Queensland. He was one of the first people in the UK to be awarded a National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) and to be made a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

      Mick is an experienced presenter. Since 1995 he has given over 500 educational workshops, seminars and conference presentations in 18 different countries. He has written and edited more than 180 papers, chapters, books and guides on various aspects of teaching and learning in HE. He is often asked to act as an advisor to projects, universities and national governments on aspects of teaching and learning in HE. Mick is a frequent visitor to Australia and has presented at approximately two-thirds of Australian Universities.

    • National Students as Partners Roundtable: Fellowship Launch (October 2015 - notes/hand-outs posted)

      Active, engaged Roundtable with 55 attendees, including students and staff, from five countries and 15 universities hosted at The University of Queensland. Hand-out with 20 case studies is here. Reflection on event from Sydney attendees. Feedback from participants available here including direction for the Students as Partners Australia Network.

      Student-Staff Partnerships to Enhance Learning and Teaching

      As the Launch event for the Students as Partners fellowship, the Roundtable will bring together local and national colleagues interested in, working on and seeking to learn about student-partners. The Roundtable aims to:

      1.     Deepen our understanding of Students as Partners
      2.     Share Students as Partners work happening in Australia 
      3.     Generate new ideas to transform our own disciplines and universities
      4.     Build a national network
      5.     Harness collective wisdom to guide the fellowship activities

      The day opens with a Workshop from Professor Mick Healey, an international authority on Students as Partners. Another international authority, Professor Peter Felten, will be joining us. Following lunch, we will spend the afternoon engaged in discussions to share practices, brainstorm possibilities, imagine student-staff partnership activities in our own universities, and generate ideas to guide the Students as Partners Fellowship.
       

      Date                     Friday, 23 October 2015
      Time & Venue    CHANGE OF VENUE. Room 202, Learning Innovation Building (LIB) Building 17, 10.00am – 5.00pm
      Register              Email Kelly Matthews on k.matthews1@uq.edu.au

      In 2015, Kelly Matthews received an Office for Learning and Teaching National Fellowship titled, Students as partners: reconceptualising the role of students in science degree programme curriculum development. With students as partners as its centrepiece, the Fellowship aims to harness student insight and creativity to transform curriculum so that students' graduate with a clear sense of learning outcomes and employability skills. The fellowship activities will highlight and outline the benefits of students as partners, for both students' own understanding of their graduate learning outcomes and academics' understanding of curriculum designed to build them. A diverse programme of high profile and impact activities will be undertaken involving establishing a Students as Partners Network, mapping national practices, piloting student-academic partnership activities in the context of The University of Queensland Bachelor of Science review, developing broadly applicable guiding principles for students as partners approaches with case studies, and facilitating national workshops. 

    • Workshop: ISSOTL Conference (October 2015 - information posted)

      90 minute session with 25 attendees discussing collaborative writing groups with staff and students.

      Learning and leading in international collaborative writing groups: Student, academic, facilitator, and coordinator perspectives

      Publishing in SoTL presents challenges for many scholars, including the unfamiliar methodologies sometimes distant from disciplinary practices and the isolation experienced by many academics as lone SoTL practitioners in their disciplines (Hutchings et al., 2011). In 2012, an International Collaborative Writing Group (ICWG) initiative aspired to build participants’ writing capacity whilst contributing new insight into scholarly teaching. Nine writing groups comprising 7-8 members worked at a distance over a year-long period with a key part of the process being a two-day residential event prior to the commencement of the ISSOTL conference in Hamilton, Canada, in October 2012. The initiative resulted in eight published articles (Healey & Marquis, 2013). The sense of belonging, capacity building in writing about SoTL, and shared learning that were highlighted in participants’ feedback on the 2012 ICWG pointed toward the process of co-authoring being a positive experience that nurtured collaboration (Marquis, Healey, & Vine, in press). The ICWG model resonated with communities of practice (CoP) as “groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p 4-5). The ‘nurtured higher education CoP’ model emphasises facilitated leadership distributed across members (McDonald et al, 2012) and is being applied to the second ICWG initiative in 2015 to foster explicitly the dynamics of the shared learning and the importance of the leadership facilitation process within the writing groups. This symposium will invite audience members into an informal, yet informative discussion on the process of shared learning and leading as it unfolds in real-time in the 2015 ICWGs from four different perspectives: student writing group member, academic writing group member, writing group facilitator, and coordinator for all writing groups. 

      Authors        Kelly Matthews, Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, Beth Marquis, Jacquie McDonald, Mick Healey
      Contact         Kelly Matthews on k.matthews1@uq.edu.au
      Day               Wednesday 28 October
      Time             4.00 - 5.30pm (session H2)