Each semester, you are invited to attend and observe a class from a selection of over 30 courses that are made 'open' to UQ staff.

Search for courses using the filter below (e.g. type in the search bar: 'UQ2U' or 'blended learning' or 'active learning'). 

To make sure a course is not overly crowded and that observations happen during appropriate classes, please book your place through the following links. Check our FAQs if you have any questions, or contact us.

Open-courses-scheme

Search open courses by keyword(s) or title

ARCA1000 Discovering Archaeology

Dr Glenys McGowan
School of Social Science

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 1-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx. 100 students

This course introduces students to archaeologists, sites, artefacts, concepts and methods to demonstrate how contemporary archaeology informs us about the ancient human past.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – authentic – scenario-based activities

This course teaches students about the concepts and theories that underlie archaeology and the interpretation of archaeological sites at an introductory level. To keep students engaged and thinking, multiple case studies are used to illustrate important concepts, and these are reinforced by authentic scenario-based activities in the tutorials. The use of humour and popular culture analogies also helps to convey key concepts.

Lecturer's short bio

Glenys McGowan is a teaching-focused academic who spends approximately 300 hours in the classroom each year. She teaches first and second-year undergraduate courses and honours coursework in archaeology. In 2016, she received the HASS Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence. Glenys employs object-based learning and authentic learning scenarios, and maintains student interest through the use of humour and popular culture references.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Fri 8–10am
  • Open weeks: 2–10, 11–12
  • Location: Forgan Smith Building #1 Room E109

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Fri 10–11am, 11am–12pm, 12–1pm
  • Open weeks: 2–10, 11–12
  • Location: Michie Building #9 Room 211

ARCS1001 Doing Archaeology

Dr Glenys McGowan
School of Social Science

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly lecture and 2-hour practical
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx 100 students

ARCS1001 provides students with a practical introduction to a broad range of archaeological methods and techniques including field survey and excavation, materials analysis and the interpretation of archaeological collections and sites.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – experiential learning – authentic scenario-based activities – professional skills building

This course is heavily focused upon teaching first-year students basic practical skills in professional archaeology that can be built upon and expanded in subsequent years. This course is key to the employability of students in professional life. The challenge is to not only teach practical techniques but also the conceptual basis for these techniques and some of the limitations to be aware of when using them in professional life.

Lecturer's short bio

Glenys McGowan is a teaching-focused academic who spends approximately 300 hours in the classroom each year. She teaches first and second-year undergraduate courses and honours coursework in archaeology. In 2016, she received the HASS Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence. Glenys employs object-based learning and authentic learning scenarios, and maintains student interest through the use of humour and popular culture references.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 8–9am
  • Open weeks: 2–10, 11–12
  • Location: Social Sciences Building #24 Room S402

Practical

  • Days and times: Mon 10am–12pm, 1–3pm; Tue 9–11am, 11am–1pm
  • Open weeks: 2–10, 11–12
  • Location: Michie Building #9 Room 325

CHEM2060 Intermediate Chemistry 2

A/Prof Gwen Lawrie
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hr lectorials weekly and a combination of workshops and practicals
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Type: approx. 60 students

This course is required in the chemistry and chemical sciences majors and serves as an elective for students in many other majors and programs. It requires 1st-year chemistry preparation.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: multimodal representations – active learning – in-class problem solving and discussion

I teach by guiding students to thinking about their thinking. Learning chemistry requires the development of mental models of what molecules look like and how they interact with each other. The focus on using diverse representational modes in chemistry and developing students' skills in translating between these. I aim to facilitate student learning as part of an inclusive classroom and community.

Lecturer's short bio

Gwen Lawrie is a Teaching Focussed Academic. She has an active research program into supporting and assessing student self-regulated learning in online environments in parallel with how teachers combine multimodal representations in teaching. Gwen is a Senior Fellow of the HEA and has been recognised by multiple national, professional and institutional teaching awards.

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Lectorial

  • Days and times: Mon 1–2pm, Fri 11–12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 3–7
  • Location: Hawken Engineering Building #50 Room N201

CHEM2058 (Employability workshops)

Prof Susan Rowland
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: Susan presenting four workshop sessions around employability
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Type: approx. 35 students

This course will provide skills in interpreting, presenting and generating industry relevant data. Employability development is a significant part of the course.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: modelling behaviours and skills – active learning workshops – student presentations – reflective and reflexive work – critical friend work

These workshops are new. I will poll students to find out what they want to learn. Students will do reflective work and give peer feedback. They will also be asked to speak in class without much warning, so plenty of impromptu presentations and articulation of ideas. Science students don't do this often; they will find it confronting and will need support. Should be fun. :-)

Lecturer's short bio

Susan is a multi-award-winning teacher of biochemistry and molecular biology. She is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and Professor of Science Education (appointed at Level C and promoted to Level D then Level E as a teaching-focused academic).

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Workshop

There are only two weeks in which Susan is running these workshops. Please contact her on 32650 (or email her below) for the dates and times to arrange a time to visit. You might even enjoy getting involved in working with the students.

Email Susan

COMU1120 Media and Society

Dr Nat Collie
School of Communication and Arts

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour seminar and online modules
  • Level: first-year undergraduate
  • Type: 400 students in seminar (groups of 100)

This course is designed to encourage the learner to examine and critically assess the relationship between the media and society. They study how media and cultural industries shape our experience of the world.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: UQ2U – blended learning – collaborative seminars – online modules

The course uses a blended approach combining 2-hour collaborative seminars in groups of 100 with 3 co-facilitators. The seminars are a mix of lecture and group-based activities. The seminars are accompanied by modules on edX that include audio, video, and animation. The material on edX scaffolds the assessments.

Lecturer's short bio

Nat Collie is a lecturer in the School of Communication and Arts. She teaches media theory, research methods, and writing.

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Tue 9–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–3, 5–7, 9, 10, 12, 13
  • Location: Prentice Building #42 Room 212
  • Note: Weeks 7 and Week 13 are writing workshops. Dr Collie is happy for visitors to email her so she can tell them which seminars might be most appropriate depending on their interests.

ECON1020 Introductory Macroeconomics

Prof KK Tang
School of Economics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour online lecture weekly, 2-hour tutorial and 1-hour workshop
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx. 500 students

ECON1020 aims at providing students with a grasp of essential macroeconomic concepts and theories and enabling them to understand contemporary domestic and international macroeconomic issues.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: UQ2U course – blended learning – weekly quizzes – workplace related learning – collaborative learning

This UQ2U course uses online videos to replace face-to-face lectures and uses tutorials and workshops for active and deeper learning. We have incorporated learning exercises and assignments that resemble workplace practice. Those materials were developed in collaboration with UQ alumni who now work as professional economists.

Lecturer's short bio

KK Tang has been teaching large introductory macroeconomic courses for many years. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and is heavily involved in the School of Economics’ venture into online education. His research is multidisciplinary, covering international trade, health, inequality and higher education.

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Workshop

  • Days and times: Fri 12–1pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Advanced Engineering Building #49 Room 200
  • Note: Tutorials are run by tutors – they are available for observation, but only if you request a visit through kk.tang@uq.edu.au.

ENGG1200 Engineering Modelling & Problem Solving

A/Prof Saiied Aminossadati
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly seminar, 2-hour weekly workshop and 2-hour weekly project session
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: seminar (approx. 400-500 students) and workshop (approx. 100 students)

ENGG1200 underpins a pathway into the community of professional engineers through development of a core-engineering competency: Engineering Modelling and Problem Solving.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – project-based learning – workshops – project sessions

The delivery model blends on-line and on-campus active learning. The on-line learning content facilitates flexible learning approaches for students, while on-campus content supports any learning gaps identified by students. Students will operate within a team of approximately six students, supported by academic staff and tutors. The project is open ended, using a design, model, build, test approach. The semester concludes with a demonstration, where teams put both virtual and physical prototypes to the test in a competitive environment.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof Aminossadati completed BEng in 1989, MEng in 1994 and PhD in 1999 in the field of Mechanical Engineering. He has more than 20 years of academic and industry experience and published more than 150 highly ranked journal and conference papers. Amin has been teaching at UQ since 2005 and has received 10 School, Faculty, University and National teaching excellence awards since 2009.

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Days and times: Mon 10–11am, 11am–12pm 'Open' weeks: 1–6 Location: UQ Centre #27A Room 226

Workshop

  • Days and times: Wed 8–10am, Thu 5–7pm, Fri 12–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: Weeks 1–8
  • Location: Hawken Engineering Building 50 C207

ENGG1300 Introduction to Electrical Systems

Dr Philip Terrill
School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering

Course overview

  • Delivery: approx. 70–90-min lecture weekly and two 2-hour hybrid practical/tutorial sessions
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx. 300 in Sem 2

An introductory course for practical and theoretical analysis techniques in electrical engineering which also provides a 'top-down' view of electrical engineering systems in industry in society. Aims to be both a 'first' and 'last' course in electrical engineering.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: practical/laboratory work – active learning

The 'active learning labs' are a hybrid of mini-lectures, tutorial style exercises, and electronics lab work. These are the core learning activities in the course and with 12 sessions a week, they need to be delegated to tutor staff. Phil invests time weekly to carefully select, train and mentor these tutors to develop their skills and capacity.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Philip Terrill is a senior lecturer in the School of ITEE. While his research work is in biomedical engineering, he has taught a range of core first, second and third year electrical engineering courses over the last 8 years.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 12–1.30pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–12
  • Location: Steele Building #3 Room 206

Practical

There will be 8–10 separate prac sessions in most weeks, and the nature/format varies from session to session. Please get in touch with Phil to work out the best class to come to.

ENGG1600 Introduction to Research Practices –  The Big Issues

Prof Lydia Kavanagh
Faculty of Science/School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly lecture and 2-hour weekly workshop; 3-hour problem-based learning (some weeks)
  • Level: undergraduate
  • Type: max 60 students – usually around 30

This course introduces students to the dynamic and exciting world of research careers. It investigates current research, research design, intellectual property and commercialisation. Students engage with UQ’s research culture through placements in research centres.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: keynote lectures – interactive workshops – reflexivity – authentic assessment

Students are treated as student researchers through authentic assessment: a paper and a conference. Their discourse is encouraged and so the sessions are set up to engage them in critical thinking and discussions. We follow the lifecycle of research (from hypotheses through to commercialisation) with each student attending a weekly 3-hour session whilst undertaking a 10-hour placement in a research centre.

Lecturer's short bio

Lydia is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy who has won both institutional and national teaching awards. She is a teaching-focused professor.

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Workshop

  • Days and times: Wed 11–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1, 2, 6–8, 10
  • Location: Priestley Building #67 Room 145
  • Notes: Wk 1 Critical thinking, Wk 2 Hypotheses, Wks 6–8 Problem-based learning sessions around experimental design and data analysis, Wk 10 Oral and written communication.
  • Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

Final conference

  • Days and times: Sat 9–12 pm
  • 'Open' week: 13
  • Location: Hawken Engineering Building #50 Rooms N201/2
  • Notes: Come and see the students engaged in authentic assessment – presenting the results of their placement.
  • Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

ERTH2002 Palaeobiology

Dr Gilbert Price
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 5-hours Contacts weekly and one half-day fieldtrip
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Type: approx. 40-50 students

The course explores the history of Earth's life, from the dawn of the planet to the present. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the application of the fossil record to contemporary problems in the Earth and Biological Sciences.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – flipped classroom – blended learning – practical approach

Hands-on Contacts that blend theory and practical; real physical objects in every class; fieldtrip to quarry where students collect their own practical teaching materials; integration of 3D models online and augmented reality; dedicated customised-program app for learning; Semester-specific Facebook group administrated by lecturer; as a trial in 2019, students will teach aspects of class (i.e. presentation of research papers during theory components of Contacts).

Lecturer's short bio

Gilbert Price is a Senior Lecturer in Palaeontology. He has no formal teaching training, hates pedagogical buzzwords and delivers the course is a way that he thinks the undergrad Gilbert would have liked (who was particularly lazy and disengaged most of the time, and with a very poor GPA). The course has maintained an average SECaT score of around 4.8 for the past several years. Gregory Webb is a UQ alumnus who is the current Dorothy Hill Chair of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy. He is a passionate teacher who uses personal experience and up-to-date information in his field to teach science as a continuing process and way of understanding, rather than as a static body of knowledge.

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Contact

  • Days and times: Mon 9–11am, Tue 9am– 12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: Mon 1–10, 11–13; Tue 1–8, 10, 11–13
  • Location: Steele Building #03 Room 229
  • Note: Weeks 1–2, 9–10, 12–13 led by Gilbert Price; Weeks 3–6 and 8 led by Gregory Webb.

GEOS3102 Global Change: Problems and Prospects

Prof Stuart Phinn
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 2-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate capstone 3rd year
  • Type: 60–120 students

This course examines some of the spatial tools used to investigate global change and the physical/human dimensions of global change processes. We investigate the future prospects of global change into the 21st century and beyond.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – reflective writing – science to action – discussion groups

This course highlights key problems of both physical and human dimensions of global change and analyses their origins, patterns and prognoses for the future. Learning is accomplished by lectures, readings and participation in class debates on major issues. Extensive use of contemporary sources (print and television current affairs, news reports and commentaries, etc.) can be anticipated.

Lecturer's short bio

Stuart Phinn's research interests are in measuring and monitoring environmental changes using earth observation data and publishing/sharing ecosystem data. He is a professor of Geography who teaches remote sensing. Stuart directs the Remote Sensing Research Centre, which includes programs to support government agencies across Australia, enabling coordination across all government, industry and research groups collecting and using EO data (Earth Observation Australia).

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 8–10am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–3, 5–9, 11–13
  • Location: Steele Building #03 Room 314/315
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Wed 10am–12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–9, 10–13
  • Location: Steele Building #3 Room 314/315
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

IBUS3960 Export Marketing & Practices

Dr Phillip Currey
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 3-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate second year
  • Type: approx. 20 students

IBUS3960 provides a practical guide to the exporting of Australian agricultural products in which students develop an export plan for a product of their choosing.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – Gatton campus

Having come from an industry background, I provide students with many practical examples from my 40-year career. They hear from 6-7 guest presenters who are experienced exporters and conduct their own research to prioritise markets for a product they have selected.

Lecturer's short bio

Phil Currey is a passionate teacher and seeks to make a contribution to the Australian agricultural sector by equipping students with the skills that can contribute to sustainable agribusinesses.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 9–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 3–10, 11–13
  • Location: Gatton Building #8117 Room 218
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Thu 2–5pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Gatton Building #8117 Room 220
  • Notes: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

LAWS3101 Income Tax Law

Dr Thea Voogt
TC Beirne School of Law

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 1-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate, final year commerce students
  • Type: approx. 300 students

LAWS3101 is an income tax law course, accredited by CA ANZ and CPA AU. It covers: Income Tax, Fringe Benefits Tax, Goods and Services Tax.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: 24/7 email inquiry – blended learning – practical approach

Thea follows a student-centred multimodal teaching strategy. The centrepiece: a 24/7 email inquiry system where students can ask questions at their own pace. Following the Ubuntu philosophy – I am because we are – Thea believes in feed-back-feed-forward across all modes of learning. She sees huge value in engaging, high-energy lectures.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Thea Voogt has won three UQ teaching awards. She teaches income tax law in large undergraduate groups, and corporate governance law intensively in small post-graduate groups. Thea is an inspiring, engaged teacher in LAWS3101. She brings complex Australian-specific legal content to life, proving that tax is never dull.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 10am–12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–3, 5–9, 12–13
  • Location: Abel Smith #23 Room 101
  • Note: Please introduce yourself at the lecture, or email Thea in advance. She is happy to share the lecture material beforehand.

LAWS5154 Public International Law

Prof Anthony Cassimatis
TC Beirne School of Law

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 1-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate advanced elective course under our old curriculum and 3rd year compulsory course under our current curriculum
  • Type: 168 students

Introduction to international law; sources; State jurisdiction and responsibility; human rights; international criminal/economic/environmental law; law of the sea; use of force/law of armed conflict.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: traditional classroom

The students are given access to all of my teaching notes prior to the commencement of classes. The time freed up by giving access to a full set of notes in advance is designed to free up time for discussion in class.

Lecturer's short bio

Anthony teaches administrative law and public international law. He has been academic coordinator of teams representing the Law School in the Jessup International Law Moot Competition over many years. In 2017, he received a national Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning from the Australian Government.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–3, 5–10,11–13
  • Location: Steel Building #3 Room 206
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

LAWS7713 Law, Terrorism and Human Rights

Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh
TC Beirne School of Law

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour weekly seminars over 8 weeks
  • Level: postgraduate
  • Type: approx. 35 students

LAWS7713 introduces the field of counter-terrorism law and policy with a focus on Australia’s response to global terrorism in the 21st century. It examines whether and how the law can uphold both national security and basic rights and freedoms and culminates in a major individual research project.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – blended learning – practical approach – contextual – multidisciplinary – research-driven

Dr Ananian-Welsh is experienced in interactive, seminar-style teaching and her teaching focuses on embedding complex concepts and then calling on students to question and apply these concepts in authentic, real-world exercises. Rebecca aims to facilitate a highly-interactive class space.

Lecturer's short bio

Rebecca is an expert in constitutional law and national security law, drawing on her experience in legal practice, government and academia. She teaches Public Law to large first-year undergraduate groups, and terrorism law to a smaller but particularly diverse group of Masters students many of whom do not have a law background. Rebecca has received teaching awards from both UNSW and UQ and is often engaged to explain complex legal issues in an engaging and accessible way.

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Tue 2–5
  • 'Open' weeks: 3–6, 8–10, 11
  • Location: Forgan Smith Building #01 Room W332
  • Note: Please introduce yourself at the lecture.

MATH1050 Mathematical Foundations

Mr Michael Jennings
School of Mathematics and Physics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly lecture, 1-hour weekly tutorial and a 1-hour weekly contact
  • Level: undergraduate
  • Type: approx. 250 students

An introductory course which covers fundamental mathematical concepts, useful to students in a wide range of discipline areas. It is the University's equivalent of Queensland high school Mathematics C.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – daily recaps – build on current knowledge – UniDoodle

Maths is learnt by doing. In this course we use UniDoodle, an audience response system which lets students write equations and sketch graphs. This instantaneous feedback allows us to tailor the course appropriately.

Lecturer's short bio

Michael Jennings is an inspirational and dedicated teacher of mathematics at UQ. He teaches large first-year courses and uses his experiences in both secondary and tertiary systems to engage and inspire students. Michael has won five UQ teaching awards as well as two national awards. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a member of the UQ College of Peer Observers.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 8–9am, Thu 11– 12pm, Fri 3– 4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 5–10, 11–13
  • Location: Prentice Building, 42 Staff House Road, Room 216

MATH1051 Calculus & Linear Algebra 1

Dr Poh Hillock
School of Mathematics and Physics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly lectures, 2-hour weekly tutorial and a 1-hour weekly computer practical
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx. 1000 students

MATH1051 covers university-level mathematical concepts useful to students in a range of discipline areas, including mathematics, business, health sciences, science, applied science and engineering.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – UQ2U course – face-to-face workshops – interactive lectures

The course has a large collection of online learning resources. We also run many face-to-face initiatives during the semester. These include extra help sessions, support tutorials, exam revision classes, pre-semester workshops.

Lecturer's short bio

Poh received her PhD from The University of Adelaide in the area of Convex Sets with Lattice Point Constraints. More recently, her interests have switched to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in mathematics. Poh is always on the lookout for practical ideas to help her first year students learn mathematics. Poh has won three UQ teaching awards and a national teaching award.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 11–12pm, Tue 9 – 10am, Thu 11 – 12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 3–5, 7–9
  • Location: Mon and Tue: Advanced Engineering Building #49 Room 200; Thu: UQ Centre 27A Room 220

MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology

Dr Jack Wang
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly lecture and 3-hour weekly practical session
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Type: approx. 350-400 students

Microbiology and Immunology covers foundational concepts in the study of microorganisms. The course content services a number of majors in the biological sciences.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: science communication – laboratory videos – blended learning – case studies

The lectures in this course are very interactive, and feature case-based learning in large classes. The practical sessions are accompanied by a series of laboratory videos to allow students to prepare ahead of time, as the hands-on laboratory skillset is vital for the safe handling of potentially deadly microorganisms that microbiologists work with on a daily basis.

Lecturer's short bio

Jack is a teaching-focused academic in microbiology, and has received UQ teaching awards at the school, faculty, and institutional level as well as a national Citation for Outstanding contribution to student learning. His work focuses on large-scale undergraduate research as well as technology-enabled learning. He has created a number of original videos and animations for biological sciences education, and leverages these resources to enable science communication to the general public.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 1–2pm, Wed 1–2pm, Fri 8–9am (27A-220)
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location:
    • Tue and Wed: Abel Smith Building #23 Room 101,
    • Fri: UQ Centre #27A Room 220
  • Note: Week 1 visits are encouraged – this is when students are introduced to interactive case studies to set the context for the course.

Workshop

  • Days and times: Tue 1–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 5
  • Location: Abel Smith Building #23 Room 101
  • Note: This will be a science communication workshop teaching students how to create a podcast.

MINE3124 Mine Ventilation

A/Prof Saiied Aminossadati
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture, 2-hour weekly tutorial and three 2-hour practicals
  • Level: undergraduate (3rd year)
  • Type: approx. 20 students

This course deals with various issues of underground mine ventilation and provides the students with the important concepts and principles they need to understand as a mining engineer to provide a safe underground working environment through sound ventilation practice.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: traditional teaching – hands-on practicals

Fundamentals will be covered in lectures, practical examples will be reviewed in tutorials and some experiments will be conducted in the practical sessions.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof Aminossadati completed BEng in 1989, MEng in 1994 and PhD in 1999 in the field of Mechanical Engineering. He has more than 20 years of academic and industry experience and published more than 150 highly ranked journal and conference papers. Amin has been teaching at UQ since 2005 and has received 10 School, Faculty, University and National teaching excellence awards since 2009.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Chamberlain Building #35 Room 210

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Fri 9–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Chamberlain Building #35 Room 211
  • Note: Amin leads the tutorials for this course.

MGTS3301 Business Policy and Strategy

Dr Stuart Middleton
Business School

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour weekly seminar
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Type: approx. 500 students (100 students in each seminar)

MGTS3301 is the capstone unit in the Bachelor of Business (Management). Students learn to apply strategic management frameworks by participating in teams to make decisions as though they are members of the Executive of an organisation.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: flipped classroom – team-based learning – gamification

In weeks 5–8 you'll see our flipped classroom approach to learning through assessable Management Team Meetings, where students make strategic decisions as Executive members of an organisation. In week 13, you will see our innovative Escape Box, where students use the knowledge and skills they have learnt to solve puzzles to open an Escape Box. Can they do it in time, and put UQ radio station 4ZZZ back on the air?

Lecturer's short bio

Stuart uses a range of teaching approaches and techniques to create an interactive learning environment for his students, one which provides support and camaraderie for everyone who enters, including his extremely valuable teaching team.

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Tue 2–5pm, Wed 8–11am, Thu 11–2pm, Fri 2–5pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 5–8, 13
  • Location: Prentice Building #42 Room 102
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

MGTS7610 Management Communication

Dr Kate Power
Business School

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 1-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: graduate
  • Type: approx. 500 students, split into three medium-sized lectures

This is a required, introductory academic and business communications course for students in the Master of Business and Master of Engineering Science.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: mini-lectures – active learning – engaging international students

As a teacher, I am guided by Buber's (1970) description of the "I-Thou" encounter, where persons meet one another as persons, rather than as things to be possessed, used, calculated, or controlled.

Lecturer's short bio

Kate teaches large graduate classes with a high percentage of students for whom English is an additional language. She joined UQ mid-2018, coming from UBC Vancouver, where she was nominated by students for a prestigious Killam Teaching Prize. A peer reviewer of her teaching says she "busts the myth that international students don't talk in class".

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 12–2pm, Thu 8–10am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location:
    • Tue: Hawken Engineering Building #50 Room T105
    • Thu: Parnell Building #07 Room 234

NUTR3000 Nutrition & Exercise

Associate Professor David Jenkins
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour and 1-hour lectures weekly
  • Level: undergraduate
  • Type: approx. 400 students

The course focuses on the biochemical and physiological foundations underpinning the relationship between nutrition and exercise performance, and how diet and physical activity impact on health.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: engaging lectures – anecdotes – humour

David's teaching style enables him to connect with his students, even when there are around 400 in the class. He uses humour and anecdotes to communicate contemporary knowledge of both exercise and nutrition for fitness and health to his students. These are old school 'chalk and talk' lectures done particularly well.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof David Jenkins is a Level D Exercise Physiologist who has worked at UQ for 27 years. He has been awarded an ALTC Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning for 'sustained excellence in teaching exercise science to large undergraduate classes with a focus on social and professional engagement'.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 12–2pm and Thu: 1–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–3, 5–7, 9–12
  • Location:
    • Tue: Advanced Engineering Building #49 Room 200
    • Thu: Hawken Engineering #50 Room T203
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

PHTY3250 Physiotherapy Specialities: Cardiothoracics

Dr Allison Mandrusiak
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture, 1-hour weekly lecture and 2-hour weekly practical/simulation
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Type: approx. 140 students

PHTY3250 is about helping people who have heart and lung conditions, patients in hospital after surgery, and those who are critically unwell in intensive care.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – simulations – practicals – experiential learning – lectures

Historically, cardiothoracics has been an unappealing field, a lesser-known cousin of the more famous sports or musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Students typically don’t envisage a career as a cardiothoracic physiotherapist, clearing phlegm from a patient’s lungs. This is Allison's challenge – to infuse a ‘breath of fresh air’ into learning about the lungs, and put a pulse into the heart of this course.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Allison Mandrusiak breathes fresh life into a historically unpopular area of physiotherapy, and proves that clearing phlegm can be surprisingly fun! Her fresh approach has secured her a number of teaching awards, including UQ, national, and an international (Universitas 21) Teaching Excellence Award.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2 and 3
  • Location: Steele Building (3), Room 309
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

Simulation

  • Days and times: Wed 2–3pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 5, 9, 10
  • Location: Therapies Annexe #84a Room 635
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the teacher on your arrival.

POLS3512 Global Media, War and Peace

Dr Sebastian Kaempf
School of Political Science and International Studies

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture, 1-hour weekly tutorials and 3-hour practical MediaLabs
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Type: approx. 100 students

The course explores the transforming intersection between infotech/media and violent conflict.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: face-to-face practical workshops – interactive tutorials – experiential learning – semi-interactive lectures

Each topic undergoes a particular learning cycle: lecture opens the new topic, students then read on the topic for discussions in tutorial before students engage in a self-driven practical experiential learning activity outside contact hours. Finally, the entire course meets for a 3-hour MediaLab for practical engagement - 'taking the lid off' the technologies and info tech that has been at the centre of the particular topic.

Lecturer's short bio

Seb has been at UQ for 13 years. He has won UQ and national awards for teaching excellence and is the convener of the UQx MOOC 'Global Media, War and Technology' which addresses similar issues as the on-campus course POLS3512.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 2–4pm
  • Open weeks: 1–3, 6, 9–10, 12
  • Location: Hawken Engineering Building #50 Room T103
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

MediaLabs

  • Days and times: Thu 11am–2pm
  • Open' weeks: 5, 9, 10
  • Location: Sir Llew Edwards Building #14 Room 219
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

PUBH1103 Health Systems and Policy

Dr Allyson Mutch
School of Public Health

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture and 2-hour tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: 270 students in total (100 per tutorial)

PUBH1103 provides a critical look at the Australian Health system and associated policy using a health equity lens. Current policy debates and complex, multidimensional 'wicked problems' are examined and critically discussed.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: interactive lectures – collaborative learning tutorials

Lectures engage students in discussion and debate and where possible feature community members who discuss what is happening on the ground. Tutorials emphasise the co-construction of learning, with group debate and discussion the key focus of all activities.

Lecturer's short bio

Allyson in a T&R academic in the School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the social determinants of health and population groups experiencing disadvantage. This work carries over to her teaching where she focuses on the social determinants of health as a threshold concept and engages with student partners to help students navigate the uncertainty and discomfort that often arises when engaging with a social view of health.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Physiology Building #63 Room 348
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

PSYC2361 Psychology of Criminal Justice

A/Prof Blake McKimmie
School of Psychology

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour weekly workshop (for 9 weeks)
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year elective
  • Type: Up to 120 students

This course systematically explores the effectiveness of the law and justice system from a psychological perspective. Students follow a fictional crime from when it is committed, during the investigation phase, through to the trial.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – flipped classroom – peer learning – spaced learning

Blake uses research on effective learning to motivate students’ behaviour. He uses the flexibility of a flipped classroom and pre-recorded lecture videos to change the way he has contact with students and designs assessment items. His courses: 1) Make use of spaced learning, 2) Use repeated testing before and after exposure to content, 3) Have regular meaningful assessment tasks in class.

Lecturer's short bio

Blake has won teaching excellence awards and three international teaching awards, including the edX prize (2018). He currently teaches a large introductory psychology course, a second year elective about psychology and law, and is a leading instructor of the award-winning MOOC CRIME101x and PSYC1030x. His research focuses on jury decision-making including the influence of gender-based stereotypes and the influence of different modes of evidence presentation.

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Workshop

  • Days and times: Fri 12–3pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9
  • Location: McElwain Building #24A Rooms 201/202/203/204
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival, classes are 3-hour long workshops. We will be doing group assessment in these classes, there is no lecture (these are viewed online before students come to the workshop – if you want to view the lectures, you can access them either via the course website or directly on edX.org, search for CRIME101x).

PSYC3020 Measurement in Psychology

Prof Mark Horswill
School of Psychology

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture workshop and 2-hour weekly tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Type: approx. 550 students

This UQ2U course is the capstone course for psychology majors. It is a mandatory core course, covering measurement theory and practice in psychology.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: UQ2U course – blended learning – Activelearn – question-focussed – participation points – weekly quizzes – interactive demonstrations

My approach includes a number of innovations designed to reduce fail rates to zero and increase student performance and employability. It has resulted in higher grades, high SECaTS, near-capacity attendance, as well as excellent student engagement.

Lecturer's short bio

Professor Horswill won the international edX MOOC of the Year 2018 for the UQx course, Crime101x (with Blake McKimmie and Barbara Masser). This course also won the Reimagine Education Star Awards 2018 (Bronze, Social Sciences) and the 2016 Merlot Classics Award. Professor Horswill was voted 3rd and 5th in the UQ lecturer of the year contest run by Unijobs.com.au in 2009 and 2008, the UQ award for teaching excellence (individual 2009; group 2016) and is an HEA Fellow.

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Lecture/workshop

  • Days and times: Mon 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–11, 13
  • Location: UQ Centre #27A Room 220

PSYC4191 Improving Human Performance

Prof Mark Horswill
School of Psychology

Course overview

  • Delivery: 4-hour weekly workshop (for 10 weeks)
  • Level: 4th year/honours
  • Type: approx. 150 students

PSYC4191 is a 4th year elective in psychology, covering strategies for improving human performance via both training/education and system design.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – ActiveLearn – question-focussed – interactive demonstrations – weekly quizzes

My approach includes a number of innovations designed to reduce fail rates to zero and increase student performance and employability. It has resulted in higher grades, high SECaTS, near-capacity attendance, as well as excellent student engagement.

Lecturer's short bio

Professor Horswill won the international edX MOOC of the Year 2018 for the UQx course, Crime101x (with Blake McKimmie and Barbara Masser). This course also won the Reimagine Education Star Awards 2018 (Bronze, Social Sciences) and the 2016 Merlot Classics Award. Professor Horswill was voted 3rd and 5th in the UQ lecturer of the year contest run by Unijobs.com.au in 2009 and 2008, the UQ award for teaching excellence (individual 2009; group 2016) and is an HEA Fellow.

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Workshop

  • Days and times: Tue 10am–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–9, 12
  • Location: Gordon Greenwood #32 Room 215

RELN1001 Belief & Unbelief

A/Prof Neil Pembroke
School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hr weekly lecture
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Type: approx. 30 students

This course covers philosophical arguments for and against belief in God.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – Padlet – Q&A – in-class debates

A/Professor Pembroke is committed to an active learning approach and uses a flipped-classroom approach from Week 3 onward to teach this course. He believes the classroom needs to be a dynamic and interactive space, marked by integrity, respect and empathy.

Lecturer's short bio

Neil Pembroke has been teaching at UQ since 2003 in the discipline of Studies in Religion. His teaching interests include Jung and Human Spirituality, Religion and Health, Mysticism, Psychology of Religion, and Religion and the Psychotherapies. Neil was Director of Teaching and Learning for the School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry for four years, and during that time instigated a pilot program using the flipped classroom.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Wed 10am– 12pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: Priestley Building #67 Room 348
  • Note: Visitors should come between 10.30 and 11.30am from Week 3 for the opportunity to see Padlet and the flipped model in action.

SLAT7807 Classroom Second Language Acquisition

A/Prof Noriko Iwashita
School of Languages and Cultures

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour weekly online lecture, 2-hour weekly Contact
  • Level: postgraduate
  • Type: approx. 140 students split into 3 groups of 30-40

The primary aim of this course is to explore learning not teaching. It is concerned with how classroom learners construct the mental system that underlies their use of an L2, not with how teachers teach.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – flipped classroom – active learning

To maximise students' active participation, the course is delivered in a flipped mode. Class time is then devoted to active learning activities such as discussion, problem-solving, language learning analysis, and so on. To get the most out of the course, students are encouraged to adopt independent learning skills and take responsibility for their learning.

Lecturer's short bio

Noriko Iwashita has been teaching postgraduate applied linguistics courses in the Master of Applied Linguistics since 2005. She is passionate about sharing her experience as a language educator and conducts classes which employ an active learning strategy and an enquiry-based learning approach to encourage students to become autonomous learners. She is an HEA Senior Fellow and active promoter of Students as Partners projects.

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Tutorial (workshop)

  • Days and times: Mon 4–6pm, Wed 8–10 am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–10, 11–13
  • Location: 
    • Mondays: Michie Building #9 Room 211 -
    • Wednesdays: Sir Llew Edwards Building #14 Room 217
  • Note: Please introduce yourself to the lecturer on arrival.

VETS1021 Functional Anatomy of Locomotion and the Integument

Dr John (Dick) Wright
School of Veterinary Science

Course overview

  • Delivery: Not a traditional lecture and practical class each week because of cadaver and facilities availability. 24 hours of lectures and 39 hours of practical classes (dissections) in total.
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year BVSc (Hons)
  • Type: approx. 150 students

VETS1021 delivers locomotory anatomy, predominantly of dogs and horses through dissection using abattoir-sourced tissues and cadavers supplemented by a plethora of resources including 3D images, a bone and tissue museum, and dissection videos.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – active learning – Gatton campus

In addition to lectures and practical classes, I introduce students to the various industries centred-around horses. As I am employed casually by various racing and other equestrian authorities, I take groups of students to metropolitan race meetings and other equestrian events so that students can meet industry stakeholders and develop an introductory understanding of how these industries work.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Dick Wright is a veterinarian of 46 years who incorporates clinical material into lectures and practical classes to contextualise, integrate and rationalise equine anatomy teaching. Dick has a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education and has won school, faculty and UQ teaching awards.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Week 10 (24/9): Tue 8 – 9am Week 5 (21/8): Wed 8–10am Weeks 6–9, 12, 13: Wed 8–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 5–10, 12, 13
  • Location: Gatton Campus Building #8117 Room 106

Practical

  • Days and times: 
    • Week 10 (23/9): Mon 8am– 4pm
    • Week 10 (24/9): Tue 9am–4pm
    • Week 11 (8/10): Tue 8am–4pm
    • Week 10 (25/9): Wed 8am–1pm
    • Week 11 (9/10): Wed 8am–2pm
    • Week 13 (23/10): Wed 2–5pm
    • Week 11 (11/10): Fri 11am-5pm
  • Open' weeks: 10, 11, 13
  • Location: Gatton Campus Building #8106 Room 135
  • Note: if anyone wishes to attend the practical classes, please contact Dr Wright in advance.