• ARCS2003 - The Archaeology of Death & Crime Scenes

    Dr Glenys McGowan

    School of Social Science

    Glenys is part of the HASS Gateways project developing entry courses that are flipped, literate and aligned. Glenys is an archaeologist and heritage consultant with experience in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultural heritage. Her work includes the excavation and analysis of artefacts from the North Brisbane Burial Grounds as part of the redevelopment of Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane. Glenys has specialist skills in forensic and mortuary archaeology, taphonomy and archaeological science. Glenys's teaching is characterized by her use of humour and story-telling to capture and keep student attention while she conveys core content.

    ARCS2003 explores practices involving the systematic location and recovery of human remains and other crime scene materials. Students will gain experience in search techniques, excavation and the recovery, and analysis and conservation of material evidence that are vital in criminal investigations. This course utilises the Archaeology Teaching and Research centre to provide students with hands on experience.
     
    Lectures:- 
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 Anthropology and Human Osteology
    Week 3 Pathology
    Week 5 Bone Taphonomy
    Week 11 Disasters and Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (*Warning* This lecture contains confronting images)
    Week 12 Mass Graves and Forensic Archaeology
    Pracs:-
    Week 6 Crime Scene 1
    Week 7 Crime Scene 2
    Week 8 Crime Scene 3 
    Week 9 Crime Scene 4

    Book your Lecture           Book your Practical 

  • ARTT1106 - Looking at Art

    Associate Professor Sally Butler

    Communication and Arts School

    Sally Butler is Associate Professor in Art History in the School of Communication and Arts and Program Director of the Bachelor of Advanced Humanities (Honours). She has been a teacher of art history since 2004 at both ANU and UQ, and has also worked in education and curatorial sections of the Queensland Art Gallery. In 2014, Sally received a UQ Award for Teaching Excellence. Associate Professor Butler is also a freelance curator and arts writer whose principal areas of research are contemporary art, Indigenous arts, photography, and visual politics.

    Looking at Art is a first year course that aims to introduce students to concepts of visual communication and the discipline of art history, with particular emphasis on building skill sets in visual literacy and the structures of visual communication. Visitors to this class will see Associate Professor Butler’s management of a large size class and her informal style of lecturing with which she explains complex concepts clearly and concisely.  Associate Professor Butler uses everyday analogies, humour, and a concentration on the process of seeing to relate first year students to complex concepts of art and aesthetics. 
     
    The course is taught as 1 hour lectures and 1.5 hour tutorials.

    Book your Lecture

  • BIOM1051 - Introductory Cellular Physiology

    Associate Professor Lesley Lluka

    Biomedical Sciences School

    BIOM1051 ('Introductory Cellular Physiology') is an integrated biology course offered by the School of Biomedical Sciences with additional input from the School of Chemistry & Molecular Bioscience for students in the undergraduate Pharmacy, Dentistry and Occupational Health & Safety Science programs. It presents a comprehensive overview of how structure and function are integrated at all levels from the cell to the organism with a focus on the human. It involves three (3) lectures in most weeks, compulsory weekly workshops in the UQ Centre, five (5) compulsory 3 hour practical laboratory sessions during the semester, and optional but highly recommended 1 hour PASS peer study sessions each week from Week 3.

    Associate Professor Lluka was recognised with a 2010 UQ Award for Teaching Excellence. Associate Professor Lesley Lluka is a gifted educator whose passion for her academic discipline, outstanding communication skills and mastery of innovative pedagogy have inspired her students to ‘think like scientists’ and to acquire skills that are relevant for their future careers. Her innovation and success have been demonstrated, not only with smaller advanced level classes, but with large first-year classes and international students. Associate Professor Lluka leads a diverse team to run BIOM1051 and other similar courses for students across a broad range of programs.

    Book your Lecture

  • CHEE3003 - Chemical Thermodynamics

    Dr Greg Birkett​

    School of Chemical Engineering
    CHEE3003 is a large (>200 student) third year engineering course. In 2013 Dr Birkett changed the structure of the course from (from 3L2T to 4C) in response to student feedback. This reduced the contact time but raised the  quality of learning in class time as students were expected to do more work out of class. Through this course students explore: 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics for steady and unsteady systems, exergy analysis, equations of state, Gibbs free energy, fugacity and activity, phase equilibria, electrochemical equilibria, pure components and solutions, and chemical reaction equilibria.
     
    Dr Greg Birkett has taken a leadership role focusing on teaching within the School of Chemical Engineering and has a reputation for excellence in teaching. He has undertaken major roles in grant projects  for both research and teaching. Currently he is part of the leadership team developing the Journey Maker curriculum development with funding from the UQ TEL grants.

    Book your PBL Session                 Book your Practical

  • CHEM1100 - Chemistry 1

    Dr Gwen Lawrie

    Biomedical Sciences School
    Dr Gwen Lawrie is a teaching-focussed academic in SCMB and Director of first year chemistry (curriculum and assessment). While Dr Lawrie teaches in first, second and third year chemistry, she has a particular interest in transitions from high school to tertiary studies as well as learning progressions across the curriculum. Gwen completed a postgraduate diploma in secondary education and taught in high schools for a year; this experience has had a major influence on her practice. Dr Lawrie's teaching philosophy and strategies have been recognised through faculty, institutional and national awards for inclusive practices and the respect she has for students.  
     
    This level 1 chemistry service course is scheduled into multiple programs of study (including BSc, BBiotech, BBiomed Sci, BEng, BPharm, BHealth Sci, BENS and dual programs). It is the first core tertiary chemistry course and topics are taught in 3 modules: module 1 (atomic structure, bonding, molecular geometry, hybridisation and intro to organic chemistry); module 2 (kinetic theory of gases, intermolecular forces, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, equilibrium) and module 3 (solution equilibria, solubility, redox chemistry). With 3 parallel lecture streams involving multiple lecturers, the content is structured so that all streams move at the same pace (many students have to attend more than one stream due to timetable clashes). PowerPoint is used as the platform but the content is structured to encourage active learning.
     
    Dr Lawrie has substantial experience in teaching very large classes (up to 500 students) and she tries to incorporate multimodal strategies to give students multiple ways that they can engage with chemistry concepts. To achieve this, she incorporates visual representations through structural models, simulations and demonstrations as well as connecting to real world examples. Gwen also makes sure there are at least two 'in-class' problems that students are encouraged to attempt (with our without clickers), so that they have a  chance to apply the concepts that they have just encountered as well as gain feedback from her modelled answer (using the visualiser).  
     
    Dr Lawrie says: Like everyone, I have good days and bad days so forgive the latter! I am also happy to receive advice so if you spot something I could do better; please share :-)

    Book your Lecture

  • ECON1310 - Quantitative Economic & Business Analysis A

    Mr Carl Sherwood

    School of Economics
    ECON1310 is a large (500+ student) course that explores basic statistical concepts and techniques that are useful in business and economic contexts. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, theoretical distributions, inferential statistics (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing) and simple linear regression.  
     
    Carl Sherwood is a lecturer in the School of Economics who received a UQ Award for Teaching Excellence in 2015 and was awarded a National Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning in 2013. With a background as a civil engineer, an MBA and a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education from UQ, Carl aims to inspire students to learn through interactive, contextualised teaching that motivates students to understand the linkages between theory and real world situations. Students experience interactive lectures, tutorials, peer-assisted study sessions and a range of online materials (including videos and quizzes) to support their learning.

    Book your Lecture 1 (Thurs 4 - 5:50pm)     or    Book your Lecture 2 (Thurs 12 - 1:50pm)

  • ENGG1100 - Introduction to Engineering Design 

    A/Profs Lydia Kavanagh and Carl Reidsema ​

    Chemical Engineering School, Civil Engineering School, Info Tech & Elec Engineering, Mech & Mine Engineering School
    ENGG1100, Introduction to Engineering Design, has been specifically designed to enable students to experience what it is to be an engineer. In teams of six, students meet each week to tackle a multi-disciplinary design-prototype-build project and apply the engineering design and management processes that they are learning through active lectures and a flipped classroom. ENGG1100 is designed to welcome students to the community of engineering practice, give them tools and skills to use in their degree program and in industry, and to stimulate their thinking about professional issues that they will face as a graduate engineer.
     
    Students attend lectures, workshops, seminar sessions and project session each week. Visitors are welcome to attend any of the lectures or workshops to see some of the teaching and learning strategies being used in this course.  The large scale active learning sessions with 600 students in the UQ Centre are open to observers on a Monday, or you could visit one of the back to back lectures on a Wednesday.
     
    Associate Professors Lydia Kavanagh and Carl Reidsema lead a teaching team of approximately 70 staff to deliver ENGG1100. Lydia is the Director of First Year Engineering and Carl is the EAIT Director of Teaching and Learning. Both coordinators provide innovative leadership with initiatives including: the Special Interest Group in Engineering Education (SIGEE), the PETS (Proactively Ensuring Team Success) process, the Flipped classroom project, and Learning pathway project. They have also both received awards at the institutional and national level for teaching excellence.
     
    This course has required a heavy investment in technology enabled learning. For more information please visit the eLIPSE Centre Web page: https://www.elipse.uq.edu.au/ 

    Book your Lecture            Book your Workshop

  • GEOM2000/7000 - Introduction to Earth Observation Sciences

    Professor Stuart Phinn

    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    The aim of GEOM2000/7000 is to introduce the fundamentals of Remote Sensing by explaining and applying selected elements from light interaction theory, image data: collection - processing - analysis, map generation and accuracy assessment.

    The goals are achieved through (1) understanding of the lecture content and related reading material, (2) active participation of a field trip, (3) development of practical image analysis and processing skills in Practicals, and (4) synthesis of and reflection on achieved knowledge in compilation of assignments and an exam or a remote sensing application review.
     
    Stuart Phinn’s research interests are in measuring and monitoring environmental changes using earth observation data and publishing/sharing ecosystem data. He is a professor of Geography at the University of Queensland where he teaches remote sensing and he has established and co-directs the Remote Sensing Research Centre, Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and Australian Earth Observation Coordination Group. Most recently he was the founding director of Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network and its Associate Science Director. 
     
    He received his PhD from the University of California – Santa Barbara/San Diego State University in 1997. The majority of his work uses images collected from satellite and aircraft, in combination with field measurements, to map and monitor the Earth’s environments and how they are changing over time. A large part of this is in coastal and marine environments with C.Roelfsema. This work is done in collaboration with other environmental scientists, government environmental management agencies, NGO’s and private companies. A growing part of this work now focuses on national coordination of Earth observation activities and the collection, publishing and sharing of ecosystem data. Professor Phinn publishes extensively with his collaborators, and currently has 153 papers in refereed international journals, 1 book, and 11 book chapters. 
     
    A large part of this work also involves training the next generation of scientists and managers who effectively use remote sensing, and he has graduated 36 PhD students. Stuart is a very engaging speaker who enjoys doing a range of things when teaching to keep his students' learning active.

    Book your Lecture

  • GEOS6001 - Research Philosophy, Design & Implementation

    Professor Stuart Phinn

    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    This course provides a transition between undergraduate training and the research required for a postgraduate thesis or dissertation as part of Honours research. The approach is to provide basic insights into the essentials of research design and management. A large part of the course deals with the practical aspects of thesis construction and academic writing, along with skills generic to research and general project design, implementation and management.
     
    The content objective of the course is to develop an understanding of the nature of scientific and non-scientific research in geography, planning, and environmental management, and the necessity for project design and time management. The process objective is to develop skills to enable you to identify a significant research or applied problem, and then obtain relevant literature and design a research or project methodology to collect and analyse data for addressing the problem. The research design and implementation stage will involve selection and critical assessment of relevant literature, development of appropriate data collection and analysis strategies, formulation of research objectives and hypotheses, generation of task lists and project timelines, and identification of limitations and outputs from the research process.
     
    The course is delivered as a series of interactive workshops in weeks 1-3 and 9-12.
     
    Stuart Phinn’s research interests are in measuring and monitoring environmental changes using earth observation data and publishing/sharing ecosystem data. He is a professor of Geography at the University of Queensland where he teaches remote sensing and he has established and co-directs the Remote Sensing Research Centre, Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and Australian Earth Observation Coordination Group. Most recently he was the founding director of Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network and its Associate Science Director. 
     
    He received his PhD from the University of California – Santa Barbara/San Diego State University in 1997. The majority of his work uses images collected from satellite and aircraft, in combination with field measurements, to map and monitor the Earth’s environments and how they are changing over time. A large part of this is in coastal and marine environments with C.Roelfsema. This work is done in collaboration with other environmental scientists, government environmental management agencies, NGO’s and private companies. A growing part of this work now focuses on national coordination of Earth observation activities and the collection, publishing and sharing of ecosystem data. Professor Phinn publishes extensively with his collaborators, and currently has 153 papers in refereed international journals, 1 book, and 11 book chapters. 
     
    A large part of this work also involves training the next generation of scientists and managers who effectively use remote sensing, and he has graduated 36 PhD students. Stuart is a very engaging speaker who enjoys doing a range of things when teaching to keep his students learning active.

    Book your Lecture

  • LAWS3101 - Income Tax Law

    Dr Thea Voogt

    Law School
    Income Tax Law is a compulsory course for accounting students and there are usually about 300 students enrolled in the course. The course covers three key pieces of legislation: Income Tax Law, Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT). Knowledge from this course is a pre-requisite for students who want to sit the exams to qualifying as chartered accountants. The course challenges business students to adapt their thinking to the style applicable in a legal environment.
     
    Dr Thea Voogt is a chartered accountant with extensive business experience in managing pension funds and in risk management. Her research is focused on governance, board practices and risk. She takes a practical approach and engaging style in this Income Tax Law course and takes particular care to structure lectures so that students get personal value from the real-life application of tax law on their lives across each lecture. She applies the principle of Ubuntu in her teaching: being connected to others. Dr Voogt encourages students to invest more time in this technical and detail-driven subject through a 24/7 email facility. The course is delivered through interactive, practical lectures of two hours each week, after which students practice the application of the law in tutorial classes. 
     
    Thea is well known for the passion and commitment that she brings to the subject and her strategy to engage with students one-on-one by using an effective email system, even though the class size is large. She was awarded the TC Beirne Law School prize for the best teaching of a compulsory law course in 2015. 

    Book your Lecture

  • LAWS5231 - Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling

    Professor Andreas Schloenhardt

    Law School
    Professor Andreas Schloenhardt is Professor of Criminal Law in the TC Beirne School of Law  and a Professorial Research Fellow  at the University of Vienna, Austria. He is also a consultant to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna, Austria, and a visiting professor at the University of Zurich and the University of St Gallen, Switzerland. Andreas’ principal areas of research include criminal law, organised crime, migrant smuggling, trafficking in persons, narco-trafficking, terrorism, criminology, and immigration and refugee law.  
     
    This course demonstrates the teaching-research nexus in action and uses a range of innovative teaching and learning strategies with a highly-engaged student cohort. It is  specifically designed to encourage and improve undergraduate student research and pave the way to research higher degrees and academic presentations and publishing. Students undertake directed study on selected issues relating to trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants. Students gain a general understanding of the pattern of, and the policies and laws relating to trafficking in persons and migrant smuggling, liaise with key stakeholders in the field, and have an opportunity to present their research findings to an academic audience and publish their written material. The course is also designed to equip students with advanced research, communication, presentation, writing and team-work skills, specifically in this field of study. 
     
    The course is highly interactive with students leading a significant part of each class. Class begins with a short briefing by one of the course coordinators, followed by a  student presentation on their research topic. The presentation is then discussed by the audience  before the presenter receives feedback from his/her peers and the course coordinator. 
     
    In Semester 1, 2017, this course will be offered in conjunction with the Univeristy of Zurich. Seven students from the University of Zurich will participate alongside the UQ students with the emphasis on comparative analysis of selected issues relating to trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants in civil law and common law jurisdictions. The course will be taught intensively over one week during week 1 of Semester 1, 27 February to 3 March 2017.
     
    Staff wishing to attend any of the classes will be required to participate in the discussions. You should make your booking and then contact the course coordinator. Additional background and reading material will be provided to you before class

    Book your Lecture

  • MATH1040 - Basic Mathematics

    Mr Michael Jennings

    School of Mathematics and Physics
    MATH1040 is a large (n~250) introductory course which covers fundamental mathematical concepts, useful to students in a wide range of discipline areas, including agriculture, arts, business, health sciences, science, social sciences, applied science and engineering. It includes topics from algebra through to introductory differential and integral calculus.
     
    Mr Michael Jennings is an inspirational and dedicated teacher of mathematics at UQ. He teaches many of the large first-year courses and uses his experiences in both secondary and tertiary systems to engage and inspire students. Michael has won 4 UQ teaching awards as well as 2 national awards.

    Book your Lecture

  • MATH1051 - Calculus & Linear Algebra 1

    Dr Victor Scharaschkin​

    School of Mathematics and Physics
    MATH1051 is a large (>1200 student) first year course that provides an important foundation in calculus and linear algebra that supports further studies in pure and applied sciences, engineering, finance or further mathematics pursuits.
     
    The calculus component extends high school concepts exploring powerful and important tool and techniques used throughout the sciences. Linear algebra is the study of vectors and matrices and is extensively used to model systems of interacting elements. A further component of MATH1051 comprises an introduction to the computational mathematics package MATLAB, which is useful for many real-life applications and is compulsory for further studies in engineering and scientific computation.
     
    Dr Victor Scharaschkin is a lecturer in Mathematics who has received grants and published in the field of mathematics education as well as pure mathematics. In 2015 he won a faculty of science excellence in teaching award.

    Book your Lecture

  • MECH2410 - Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

    Dr Saiied Aminossadati​

    School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering
    This course introduces the basic principles of fluid mechanics to second year engineering students and enables them to develop an appreciation of the design principles of fluid systems. Students learn how to examine systems with a fluid as the working medium, analyse existing and design new fluid systems, and apply engineering methods to solve complex problems. The emphasis is on the development of mathematical models for basic and complex fluid problems and apply the models in various practical applications. 
     
    Dr Saiied Aminossadati began his engineering career in 1984, and qualified with BEng in 1989, MEng in 1994 and PhD in 1999. He joined The University of Queensland as an engineering lecturer in 2006. He is the leader of mine ventilation and fibre-optic sensing research at The University of Queensland and has successfully received several internal and external competitive research grants. He has established the first Heat, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Laboratory and the first Fibre-optic Sensing Application Laboratory at The University of Queensland. He has published more than 110 peer-reviewed Journal and Conference papers and given more than 40 oral presentations. 
     
    Dr Aminossadati has supervised over 70 Honours and RHD students, and is currently supervising 13 PhD students. He has gained international recognition for his research in thermos-fluids, underground mine ventilation and fibre-optic sensing systems. He is using his close relation with mining industry to introduce new technologies in this industry and is collaborating with a number of national and international institutes in this field. 
     
    Amin has recently organised and chaired the 2nd International OFSIS2017 Conference in Brisbane with the focus on the industrial and safety applications of fibre-optic and photonic sensors. 
     
    Dr Aminossadati uses an active learning strategy in this course to motivate his students to learn and understand this critical aspect of mining. He gets great satisfaction from teaching and achieves consistently high teaching and course evaluation scores. His commitment to his students’ learning has been recognised with multiple program and teaching awards.
     
    Visitors are welcome to attend any of Amin's lectures but if you wish to visit a tutorial (Thursday 4 - 6 or Friday 11 - 1) please contact him in advance.

    Book your Lecture 1 (Wed 10 - 10:50am)     or    Book your Lecture 2 (Thurs 8 - 8:50am)

  • MGTS3301 - Business Policy and Strategy

    Dr Geoffrey Greenfield and Dr April Wright​

    UQ Business School
    MGTS3301 provides a capstone learning experience for final-year business students by building upon foundational knowledge about business management that students have acquired in previous core courses and upon more specialist expertise developed in their major area(s) of study. Students apply concepts, tools, and frameworks relevant to strategy formulation and implementation to business cases and simulations to analyse how firms can create a sustainable competitive advantage in dynamic environments. Through this application and analysis, students develop a more integrated and ethically responsible understanding of the relationships between strategy and firm performance measured by financial and non-financial indicators. 
     
    The course is run as interactive seminars in which students are expected to: 
    (1) arrive fully prepared by reviewing course materials (readings, lecture slides/recordings etc.) prior to attending class; 
    (2) actively engage as self-managed learners and collaborate with students from other majors to develop a functionally-integrated understanding of business strategy and its practice; and 
    (3) display levels of professional competence in communication and teamwork required of business graduates as future leaders.
     
    Each three hour seminar has up to 108 students which in itself it is a challenge to organise and run. The flipped classroom design of the course places a greater requirement on the students to come to class prepared, however, they participate to a greater extent than in a traditional class environment. To best appreciate the course design, the best weeks to visit are weeks 4-7 for the Management Team Meetings and weeks 9 and 10 for the simulations. 
     
    April Wright is an Associate Professor in the UQ Business School, with over 20 years of university teaching experience. She won a UQ Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013 and has received national recognition for her teaching and learning work in large business courses, including the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management 'Management Educator of the Year' in 2011 and a national citation in the Australian Awards for University Teaching in 2013. April is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Management Education and her research in management education has been published in leading journals and presented at national and international conferences.
     
    Geoff Greenfield has a PhD in information systems and has been in academic roles for 15 years. He is s currently completing his Graduate Certificate in Higher Education. He believes our role as educators is to provide an environment where students can develop and learn, not only the hard skills relevant to their discipline, but also the soft skills that employers are looking for in the business market.

    Book Session 1 (Wednesdays 9 - 11:50am)     or      Book Session 2 (Thursdays 5 - 7:50pm)

  • MIDW2001/ 2002/ 2005 - Promoting Normal Birth/  Birth and Immediate Postnatal Care/  Mental Health in Pregnancy 

    Susannah Brady

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work
    This series of courses MIDW2001-MIDW2005 offer the observer the opportunity to see the facilitation of problem based learning (PBL) and the effective use of students learning within a small group. Each of the three theoretical courses focus on a particular case scenario which is explored over a four week period, utilizing problem based learning tutorials and a variety of formal and informal resource sessions.
     
    Weeks 1-4: PBL about a woman with gestational diabetes. The aspect of keeping birth normal is also covered.
    Weeks 5, 6, 8 and 9: PBL about birth and Immediate postnatal care.
    Weeks 10 - 13: PBL about womens’ and family issues dealing with mental health in the peripartum period.
     
    Susannah has experience in making quality contributions to teaching, learning and student engagement within the midwifery programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Susannah has served in leadership roles as Program Coordinator and Program Director, and in this, her key achievements are; 
    • curriculum development and introduction of the inaugural Bachelor of Midwifery in Queensland; 
    • development of the transition to midwifery practice courses which allow students to transfer between the undergraduate degree programs; and 
    • contribution to the development of courses in the Masters of Midwifery program which will assist in preparing midwives for eligibility status.
     
    Quality of Susannah’s teaching and scholarly activity within the school was recognised when she  received a “high commendation” for teaching excellence as an individual, and a “citation” for outstanding contribution to student learning for her role in the team of midwives who developed the content for the Masters of Midwifery Degree.
     
    Susannah has over 10 years teaching in the PBL format in all year levels of the bachelor of Midwifery Program. Susannah is also known for her engaging midwifery lectures, where she uses storytelling from her own clinical practice experiences to illustrate key points for students. 

    Book your class at St Lucia Campus             Book your class at Mater Hospital

  • MKTG7961 - Agribusiness Marketing

    Dr Phil Currey

    Agriculture and Food Sciences School
    The effectiveness of marketing food and fibre products is important to the viability of Australian agribusiness and the profitability of individual firms within this important sector of our economy. This course examines the principles of marketing and provides practical examples of how those principles should be and are applied by Australian agribusinesses.
     
    Phil Currey joined UQ with more than 30 years of agribusiness experience as a management consultant specialising in agribusiness marketing and as a senior executive in national and multinational agribusiness organisations. He is an experienced advisor to primary producers, food processors, value-adders, business founders, owners, directors and senior management teams. Phil has helped agribusiness owners establish a wide range of agri-food products into domestic and export markets. His experience includes more than 400 individual consultancy projects including extensive international travel for market research, negotiating orders on behalf of clients, selecting and appointing distributors, establishing international offices and negotiating joint ventures.
     
    Students appreciate the practical industry experience that Phil brings into the classroom and the relaxed style with which he engages with students. The first week is spent exploring how students learn and discovering why the course is presented in the way it is. Students attend the lecture that introduces the topic, then self-direct study until the tutorial when they discuss practical applications of the theory being discussed during the week in small groups.

    Please note this lecture is at UQ Gatton Campus

    Book your Lecture

  • NURS1004 - Preparation for Midwifery Practice 1

    Susannah Brady

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work
    This is a clinical skills based course where students learn skills that are required for midwifery practice in a workshop format. There is a lecture series to support the foundational clinical learning required to enter midwifery practice. These are held at the Mater Whitty Building but there are also two extra lectures delivered at the St Lucia campus in Weeks 5 and 6 . The scenario is based around a teenage pregnancy so the lectures Susannah delivers are about the mechanisms of labour and caring for women during labour.
     
    Susannah has experience in making quality contributions to teaching, learning and student engagement within the midwifery programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Susannah has served in leadership roles as Program Coordinator and Program Director, and in this her  key achievements, are; curriculum development and introduction of the inaugural Bachelor of Midwifery in Queensland; development of the transition to midwifery practice courses which allow students to transfer between the undergraduate degree programs; and contribution to the development of courses in the Masters of Midwifery program which will assist in preparing midwives for eligibility status.
     
    Quality of Susannah’s teaching and scholarly activity within the school was recognised when she  received a “high commendation” for teaching excellence as an individual, and a “citation” for outstanding contribution to student learning for her role in the team of midwives who developed the content for the Masters of Midwifery Degree.
     
    Susannah has over 10 years teaching in the PBL format in all year levels of the bachelor of Midwifery Program. Susannah is also known for her engaging midwifery lectures , where she uses storytelling from her own clinical practice experiences to illustrate key points for students. 
     
    Book your session at Mater Hospital            Book your session at St Lucia Campus
  • PHYL2730 - Exercise Physiology

    Associate Professor David Jenkins

    Human Movement & Nutrition Science
    Associate Professor David Jenkins is a Level D Exercise Physiologist who has worked at UQ for 26 years. He has been awarded an ALTC Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning for 'sustained excellence in teaching exercise science to large undergraduate classes with a focus on social and professional engagement'. David has been the principal advisor to 20 graduated RHD students. He has published 150 papers and has an H-index of 34 (Web of Science).
     
    David's teaching style enables him to connect with his students, even when there are around 400 in the class. He uses humour and  anecdotes to communicate  contemporary knowledge of both exercise and nutrition for fitness and health to his students. 
     
    These are old school 'chalk and talk' lectures done particularly well.
     
    Book your Lecture
  • PHYS1001 - Mechanics & Thermal Physics I

    Professor Tamara Davis

    Mathematics and Physics School
    PHYS1001 is the first 'mainstream physics' course for students intending to complete a BSc focussing on physics or students in other disciplines who want to have a thorough grounding in physics. PHYS1001 lectures do not follow the traditional lecture style. Instead students are engaged in active learning, where they become active participants in the lectures. Individual students respond with wireless response units ('clickers'). PHYS1001 has over 200 students enrolled.  
     
    Professor Tamara Davis and Professor Andrew White have exceptional reputations for both their teaching and research. Both are Vice Chancellor’s Teaching and Research Fellows. Professor White is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, and was previously an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow. Professor Davis received the Australian Academy of Science’s 2015 Nancy Millis Medal, and was the 2014 Astronomical Society of New Zealand Beatrice Hill Tinsley Lecturer & the 2011 Australian Institute of Physics Women in Physics Lecturer. 
     
    PHYS1001 is known for enthusiastic lectures combined with a new active learning environment which has resulted in lively classroom debates with a cohort that has developed a genuine thirst for a conceptual understanding of physics.
     
    Professor White teaches the first half of the course, Professor Davis the second half.
     
    Book your Lecture
  • POLS1501 - Introduction to Peace and Conflict Analysis

    Dr Sebastian Kaempf

    School of Political Science and International Studies
    This course is designed to introduce students to the burgeoning field of peace and conflict studies (PACS). It is a compulsory course for any student electing to do the major or double-major in PACS. It is also a highly recommended supplement for those pursuing an international relations major. Since the subject and course is interdisciplinary in nature, students from disciplines other than politics and international studies may also find that it fits well with their major field of concentration, especially (but not only) in the fields of law, history, sociology, development studies, journalism, and psychology.
     
    'Introduction to Peace & Conflict Analysis' focuses on the causes of war and violence, the relationship between security and development, human security, the ethical and legal restraints on war, the politics and practice of humanitarian aid, the role of the media in shaping conflict (perception), and the role of international institutions such as the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross. The course will examine contemporary cases such as the Rwandan Genocide, the Arab Spring, the politics behind the media representations of war/peace, the emergency response to the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami, the challenges of rebuilding Afghanistan and Iraq, and the humanitarian disaster in Darfur, among others.
     
    Observe one of Seb's high quality lectures where he immerses his students in 'visuals' through Blackboard and uses PowerPoint and a range of other teaching tools effectively to keep the learners engaged. He demonstrates successful strategies for managing a large class.
     
    Book your session
  • POLS3512 - Global Media, War, and Peace

    Dr Sebastian Kaempf

    School of Political Science and International Studies
    This course explores the origins and contemporary roles of media in international affairs, both as a source of information and, increasingly, as an important medium of war, peace, and diplomacy. The course is composed of three tracks. The first is foundational, focusing on the dual development of colonial and media empires from early days of the panorama, photography, print media, radio, TV, global news corporations, to today’s Internet (web 2.0) - thus covering the origins of and evolution from old to digital new media. The second is theoretical, using classical International Relations and critical theory to examine media as product and instrument of cultural, economic and political struggles. The third is practical, using second weekly 'Global Media Workshops' in which guest media practitioners (from war reporters, film documentary makers, bloggers, to social media activists) teamed with International Relations theorists will present classes in a variety of media, including print, photography, radio, cinema, television, and online convergences. Combining history, theory, critical viewing, and film screenings, and based on a retrospective study of news media, documentaries, and critical media theory, the course will map the complex contemporary global media environment where the satellite, Internet and cell phone, among other recent technologies, have created a new political panorama of messages, meanings and stratagems directly affecting international politics and questions of war and peace.

     
    Observe one of Seb's high quality lectures and/or interactive medialabs. Ideally, to understand and experience how the learning cycle works in this course, visitors are recommended to attend the lecture (first) and the related medialab on the lecture theme second. But just attending one or the other of course is equally fine. 

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  • PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology

    Associate Professor Mark Nielsen

    School of Psychology
    This course provides an introduction to lifespan developmental psychology, emphasising recent theory and research. It is not possible to cover all aspects of human lifespan development within any one course, and so lectures will feature key issues, sometimes focusing on some age ranges more than others, but using examples from other ages. Throughout, the course will emphasise developmental psychology as a research discipline. Students will learn to understand and think critically about theoretical issues and empirical research and to communicate this understanding.
     
    Delivery consists of a standard lecture format and accompanying tutorials. Visitors to the course will observe the lecturer using a range of strategies to engage the students including the acting out of examples of  experiments, and the use of UQWordCloud, UQWordStream and UQPoll as mechanisms to interact with students in class. 
     
    Mark Nielsen is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology and Deputy Head of the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland, and a Senior Research Associate of the University of Johannesburg. 
     
    Mark has studied a range of inter-related aspects of socio-cognitive development in young human children and nonhuman primates, with his research primarily focused on charting the origins and development of the human cultural mind. He is also interested in how culture shapes the way children develop and has set up field sites in remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory and Southern Africa. A/Prof Nielsen has published over 50 articles and is an associate editor of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.
     
    Mark's lectures in this course are:
    March 21 – Child development in a cross-cultural context
    May 2 – Pretending, theory of mind and autism
    May 16 – Child development and media exposure
    May 30 – Religion and child development
     
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  • PSYC3010 - Psychological Research Methods III

    Associate Professor Winnifred Louis

    School of Psychology
    Winnifred R. Louis (PhD McGill, 2001) is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland. Her research interests focus on the influence of identity and norms on social decision-making. She has studied this broad topic in contexts from politics and community activism to health and environmental choices.  Winnifred has won a 2016 UQ Award for Excellence in Research Higher Degree Supervision, a 2012 honourable mention for the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award, nomination by UQ in 2012 for Australian Teaching Excellence Awards, a 2011 University of Queensland Award for Teaching Excellence, a 2010 University of Queensland Commendation for Teaching Excellence, the 2009 Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (University of Queensland) Teaching Excellence Award; and a 2008 Pearson Education and Australian Psychological Society Early Career Teaching Award (a national award).
     
    Psychology – research methods. This third year course is required and builds on two previous courses. It covers multivariate statistics – factorial ANOVA (between/mixed/within) and multiple regression (including mediation and moderation). Delivery is lecture-based with a weekly tute in weeks 2-12. There are many online activities and assessments throughout the term. The tute supports the assignments with a focus on learning SPSS (a computer stats software) and how to generate analyses from hypotheses and then interpret the results.
     
    Academics are welcome at any time. The lectures in weeks 1 and 13 have more admin, and the lecture 12 is optional, so weeks 2-10 are your best bet for intense stats material. Weeks 2-4 are on ANOVA (distinguishing differences between groups) and weeks 6-9 are on regression (distinguishing associations between continuous variables). There are in class quizzes in weeks 3 and 4 (new this year) which may create interesting logistical chaos. Depending on your interests (and own previous stats knowledge) the tutes may be more watchable; you would need to check  with Winnifred so that she can tee up the tutors.
     
    I have experimented with a lot of large class management techniques like using technology, questions and active learning. I welcome all feedback and suggestions from peers as I wrestle with the challenge of maintaining attendance in my classes (usually drops to 30% by the end of the semester!). Managing the diversity of expectations and skills is also hard (statistical enjoyment in psychology is pretty polarized, with a smaller group of tolerant learners and keeners and a larger group of warm-hearted nurturing types who did not sign up for psychology for number games, thank you very much). So I’m looking forward to your great ideas. 
     
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  • SCIE1000 - Theory and Practice in Science

    Prof Peter Adams and Prof Peter O'Donoghue​

    Biological Sciences School, Chemistry & Molec Biosciences, Historical & Philosophical Inq, Info Tech & Elec Engineering, Mathematics & Physics School
    SCIE1000, Theory and Practice in Science, is a foundation course in science that introduces students to the broad range of mathematical, analytical, conceptual and computational tools employed by scientists to develop, analyse and interpret models of scientific processes. This course currently has over 800 students enrolled to participate in weekly lectures and tutorials. The lectures assume pre-readings and aim to develop understanding through discussion (as a whole class and in small groups) and problem solving. The tutorials provide opportunities for students to work through problems individually and in small groups with tutors providing personalised help.
     
    SCIE1000 is jointly taught by academic staff from three faculties: Science (Peter Adams, Peter O’Donoghue, Christine Beveridge, Anthony Richardson), EAIT (Marcus Gallagher) and HASS (Peter Ellerton and Joel Katzav). Most lectures are delivered jointly by Peter Adams and Peter O'Donoghue. Both have received national recognition for their teaching excellence, winning teaching awards and leading national teaching projects. Peter O'Donoghue is a previous winner of the Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in teaching, and Peter Adams is Associate Dean Academic for the Science faculty. This group of teachers have excellent reputations amongst staff and students based on their dedication, passion and talent for teaching.
     
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  • SPCH2106 - Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice

    Dr Anne Hill

    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences 
    Dr Anne Hill is a speech pathologist of over 30 years experience. She has been teaching within the UQ speech pathology programs for over 10 years and has taught this particular course for the majority of that time. The focus of her research program is around scholarship of teaching and learning. Anne’s excellence in teaching has been recognised with School and faculty teaching awards and in 2015, Anne received a UQ Teaching Excellence award. Anne’s innovations in teaching focus around the use of simulated learning environments to support students’ development of critical skills for speech pathology practice. Anne is recognised as a respectful and inspiring teacher who facilitates student learning through active engagement with a range of different learning techniques and incorporation of her extensive clinical experience into lecture and activity content.
     
    SPCH2106 Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice and SPCH7820 Articulation and Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practic are foundation courses within the Bachelor of Speech Pathology (Honours) Year 2 program and the Master of Speech Pathology Studies Year 1 program. They are co-taught with similar lecture content for both groups, but with different clinical practice experiences and different assessment.
     
    These courses focus on a key area of speech pathology practice, the assessment and management of speech sound disorders in children. The teaching and practical activities are designed to support students’ development of knowledge and skills related to this area. The courses involve a range of teaching and assessment activities, including face to face lectures focussing on background information and key strategies for understanding the clinical process, video case-based teaching, and in class learning activities focussed on practical aspects of speech sound assessment, analysis and interpretation, and intervention planning. Dr Hill makes excellent use of video and anecdotal examples from her clinical experience to support students’ understanding of concepts and application. She uses learning techniques such as open questioning, summarising learning in short chunks and respectful engagement with her students. 
     
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  • SPCH7820 - Articulation and Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice

    Dr Anne Hill

    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences 
    Dr Anne Hill is a speech pathologist of over 30 years experience. She has been teaching within the UQ speech pathology programs for over 10 years and has taught this particular course for the majority of that time. The focus of her research program is around scholarship of teaching and learning. Anne’s excellence in teaching has been recognised with School and faculty teaching awards and in 2015, Anne received a UQ Teaching Excellence award. Anne’s innovations in teaching focus around the use of simulated learning environments to support students’ development of critical skills for speech pathology practice. Anne is recognised as a respectful and inspiring teacher who facilitates student learning through active engagement with a range of different learning techniques and incorporation of her extensive clinical experience into lecture and activity content.
     
    SPCH2106 Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice and SPCH7820 Articulation and Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practic are foundation courses within the Bachelor of Speech Pathology (Honours) Year 2 program and the Master of Speech Pathology Studies Year 1 program. They are co-taught with similar lecture content for both groups, but with different clinical practice experiences and different assessment.
     
    These courses focus on a key area of speech pathology practice, the assessment and management of speech sound disorders in children. The teaching and practical activities are designed to support students’ development of knowledge and skills related to this area. The courses involve a range of teaching and assessment activities, including face to face lectures focussing on background information and key strategies for understanding the clinical process, video case-based teaching, and in class learning activities focussed on practical aspects of speech sound assessment, analysis and interpretation, and intervention planning. Dr Hill makes excellent use of video and anecdotal examples from her clinical experience to support students’ understanding of concepts and application. She uses learning techniques such as open questioning, summarising learning in short chunks and respectful engagement with her students. 
     
    Book your Session
  • TOUR7052 - Travel Distribution and Transport Systems

    Dr Pierre Benckendorff 

    School of Business
    TOUR7052 acquaints students with international, regional and local transport modes, networks and patterns, passenger flows and regulation. This course has been developed using a 'flipped teaching' model in the form of blended learning that includes the use of technology to leverage learning during class time, so the lecturer can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing. Students spend their class time working in teams on a simulation or problem-based learning activities. TOUR7052 is a small postgraduate coursework subject with about 90 students.
     
    A range of technologies (padlet, simulation, online lectures) are used and students work their way through authentic learning experiences aligned to the assessment. The best dates for visits would be review weeks (when the students use padlet to generate questions about the course content) and practice weeks (when students apply their learning by working on problem-based learning activities). Review weeks are 7/3, 28/3, 16/5. Practice weeks are 11/4, 9/5, 30/5.
     
    Dr Pierre Benckendorff has more than 15 years experience in education and research in the tourism field. His passion for travel and tourism has taken him to some of the world’s leading theme parks and airports, the major cities of Europe and North America, the African Savannah and the bustling streets of Asia. He has also travelled extensively throughout Australia and New Zealand. His research interests include visitor behaviour, tourism information technologies, and tourism education and training. He has authored over 80 publications in these areas in leading international journals and is a regular speaker at tourism research conferences. Pierre is actively involved in a number of national projects totalling over $700,000 in grant funding. He is on the editorial board for the Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research and is a regular reviewer of papers published in some of the world’s leading academic tourism journals.
     
    Pierre is also an award winning university lecturer and has held several teaching and learning leadership positions at both The University of Queensland and James Cook University. In 2007 he received a national Carrick (now Office for Learning and Teaching) citation for outstanding contributions to student learning. He has developed and taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in introductory tourism management, international tourism, tourist behaviour, tourism and leisure futures, tourism transportation, tourism operations, tourism technologies, tourism analysis, business skills and marketing communications.
     
    He is currently the co-chair of knowledge creation for the BEST Education Network and in this capacity has worked with the World Travel and Tourism Council to edit a book of international cases based on Tourism for Tomorrow award finalists and winners. He has also co-authored one of the leading textbooks on tourism and information technology.
     
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  • TOUR7031 - Visitor Management

    Dr Karen Hughes

    School of Business
    Dr Hughes has been teaching and researching in the area of tourism for approximately 25 years, and prior to commencing with UQ, worked at James Cook University, Darwin University and QUT. Her PhD explored the impact of wildlife tourism and post-visit support on families’ conservation learning. Since commencing teaching at UQ in 2009, she has earned a reputation for her ability to effectively engage large classes at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. 
     
    Karen’s approach to classroom teaching is based on the belief that engagement and enjoyment are fundamental to student learning. Her classes include a variety of informal debates; personal reflection exercises; think, pair, share exercises; small group discussions; ‘share my culture’ activities; speed networking sessions, role plays and case studies. The aim is to develop a supportive environment that values co-creation of knowledge. Wherever possible, classroom activities are designed to encourage students to discuss their experiences, knowledge and insights; to solve problems specific to their home country; and to understand other viewpoints.  
     
    This course examines the design and management of tourist experiences. It explores settings ranging from the global to local landscapes, streetscapes and servicescapes. Topics include visitor motivation, designing and staging tourist experiences, orientation, interpretation, visitor learning, and managing cross-cultural and social interactions.
     
    The course is a post-graduate course for a cohort that is predominantly Chinese. It is specifically designed for students with no previous qualifications in tourism, hospitality and events. Sessions use a lecture/workshop format where activities and exercises are blended with traditional lectures for the 150-160 students. 
     
    The best weeks to attend are: 1,2,4,5 and 11
     
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