• ARCS2003 - The Archaeology of Death & Crime Scenes 'Forensics'

    Dr Glenys McGowan

    School of Social Science

    Glenys is part of the HASS Gateways project developing entry courses that are flipped, literate and aligned. Glenys is an archaeologist and heritage consultant with experience in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultural heritage. Her work includes the excavation and analysis of artefacts from the North Brisbane Burial Grounds as part of the redevelopment of Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane. Glenys has specialist skills in forensic and mortuary archaeology, taphonomy and archaeological science.

    Glenys's teaching is characterized by her use of humour and story-telling to capture and keep student attention while she conveys core content.

    ARCS2003 explores practices involving the systematic location and recovery of human remains and other crime scene materials. Students will gain experience in search techniques, excavation and the recovery, and analysis and conservation of material evidence that are vital in criminal investigations. This course utilises the Archaeology Teaching and Research centre to provide students with hands on experience.

    Lectures:
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 Anthropology and Human Osteology
    Week 3 Pathology
    Week 4 The Archaeology of Death
    Week 5 Bone Taphonomy
    Week 11 Disasters and Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (*Warning* This lecture contains confronting images)
    Week 12 Mass Graves and Forensic Archaeology

    Pracs:
    Week 7 Crime Scene 1
    Week 8 Crime Scene 2
    Week 9 Crime Scene 3

    The Archaeology Teaching and Research Centre (ATARC) 56J is near the UQ Lakes Bus Stop and opposite the CityCat Ferry Terminal.

    Book your Lecture           Book your Practical 

  • ARTT1106 - Looking at Art

    Sally Butler

    School of Communication and Arts

    Sally Butler is Associate Professor in Art History in the School of Communication and Arts and Program Director of the Bachelor of Advanced Humanities (Honours). She has been a teacher of art history since 1998 at ANU, QUT, Griffith University and UQ, and has also worked in education and curatorial sections of the Queensland Art Gallery. In 2014, Sally received a UQ Award for Teaching Excellence and in 2018 was made a Senior Fellow of the UK-based Higher Education Academy. Associate Professor Butler is also a freelance curator and arts writer whose principal areas of research are contemporary art, Indigenous arts, cross-culturalism, and visual politics.

    Looking at Art is a first year course that  introduces  students to the discipline of art history and visual communication skills through an active learning program based on rotating lectures with weeks of object-based learning conducted in galleries on and off campus. Multiple frequent assessments in the form of in-class worksheets, 2-phased research assignments, and an online quiz support the active learning structure and keep students focused on key points and applied knowledge. Visitors to this class will see Associate Professor Butler’s management of a large size class and her informal style of lecturing with which she explains complex concepts clearly and concisely. Her use of everyday analogies, humour, and concentration on the process of seeking to relate first year students to complex concepts of art and aesthetics.

    The course is taught as a 2 hour lecture rotated fortnightly with 2 hour tutorial/workshops delivered by a team of 6 tutors.

    Book your Lecture

  • BIOM1051 - Introductory Cellular Physiology

    Associate Professor Lesley Lluka

    School of Biomedical Sciences

    BIOM1051 ('Introductory Cellular Physiology') is an integrated biology course offered by the School of Biomedical Sciences with additional input from the School of Chemistry & Molecular Bioscience for students in the undergraduate Pharmacy, Dentistry and Occupational Health & Safety Science programs. It presents a comprehensive overview of how structure and function are integrated at all levels from the cell to the organism with a focus on the human. It involves three (3) lectures in most weeks, compulsory weekly workshops in the UQ Centre, five (5) compulsory 3 hour practical laboratory sessions during the semester, and optional but highly recommended 1 hour PASS peer study sessions each week from Week 3.

    Associate Professor Lluka was recognised with a 2010 UQ Award for Teaching Excellence. Associate Professor Lesley Lluka is a gifted educator whose passion for her academic discipline, outstanding communication skills and mastery of innovative pedagogy have inspired her students to ‘think like scientists’ and to acquire skills that are relevant for their future careers. Her innovation and success have been demonstrated, not only with smaller advanced level classes, but with large first-year classes and international students. Associate Professor Lluka leads a diverse team to run BIOM1051 and other similar courses for students across a broad range of programs.

    Book your Lecture           Book your Workshop

  • BLDG3120 - Building Structures and Envelopes

    Michael Dickson

    School of Architecture

    Building Structures and Envelopes is a course which focusses on architectural technology, construction and building performance. Architectural technology has always struggled to engage students in the Architecture programs due to the dry and technical nature of the content.

    The cohort is a third year undergraduate class of approximately 95 students. This class is run as a flipped class with the core content delivered online while in-class activities focus on assignment work. Students are engaged with real world problems and team work to motivate them to apply their knowledge in an on-campus setting where teacher and support teachers can best assist. On-line core knowledge has helped to deliver an efficient program and has allowed students to re-engage with topics throughout the course. The on-line content is also helpful to students who have English as a second language.

    Aside from normal “studio based” teaching there are presentations from industry experts, assignment reviews, a field trip and in-class quizzes .

    Michael is an academic with 12 years of experience at UQ and is currently Director of Teaching and Learning in the School of Architecture. His teaching practice has been moving towards a flipped model for nearly 5 years and although there is still more he could learn about the model, he can provide advice to anyone wanting to migrate their teaching practice to flipped classes

    Book your Workshop

  • CHEE3003 - Chemical Thermodynamics

    Dr Greg Birkett

    School of Chemical Engineering

    CHEE3003 is a large (>200 student) third year engineering course. In 2013 Dr Birkett changed the structure of the course from (from 3L2T to 4C) in response to student feedback. This reduced the contact time but raised the quality of learning in class time as students were expected to do more work out of class. Through this course students explore: 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics for steady and unsteady systems, exergy analysis, equations of state, Gibbs free energy, fugacity and activity, phase equilibria, electrochemical equilibria, pure components and solutions, and chemical reaction equilibria.

    Dr Greg Birkett has taken a leadership role focusing on teaching within the School of Chemical Engineering and has a reputation for excellence in teaching. He has undertaken major roles in grant projects for both research and teaching. Currently he is part of the leadership team developing the Journey Maker curriculum development with funding from the UQ TEL grants.

    Book your Lecture            Book your Practical

  • CHEM1090 - Introductory Chemistry

    Associate Professor Gwen Lawrie

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

    A/Professor Gwen Lawrie is a teaching-focussed academic in SCMB and Director of first year chemistry (curriculum and assessment). While A/Professor Lawrie teaches in first, second and third year chemistry, she has a particular interest in transitions from high school to tertiary studies as well as learning progressions across the curriculum. Gwen completed a postgraduate diploma in secondary education and taught in high schools for a year; this experience has had a major influence on her practice. A/Professor Lawrie's teaching philosophy and strategies have been recognised through faculty, institutional and national awards for inclusive practices and the respect she has for students, and in 2107 she was recognised as a Senior Fellow Of the Higher Education Academy.

    This course introduces the core concepts and principles in chemistry at a foundation level that enables students who have not previously studied chemistry to progress further in tertiary chemistry. Concepts encountered are all considered in contexts that develop quantitative chemistry skills. Gwen delivers introductory concepts in atomic structure, bonding and states of matter.

    A/Professor Lawrie has substantial experience in teaching very large classes (up to 500 students) and she tries to incorporate multimodal strategies to give students multiple ways that they can engage with chemistry concepts. To achieve this, she incorporates visual representations through structural models, simulations and demonstrations as well as connecting to real world examples. Gwen also makes sure there are at least two 'in-class' problems that students are encouraged to attempt (with or without clickers), so that they have a chance to apply the concepts that they have just encountered as well as gain feedback from her modelled answer (using the visualiser).

    Like everyone, I have good days and bad days so forgive the latter! I am also happy to receive advice so if you spot something I could do better; please share :-)

    Book your Lecture

  • CHEM1100 - Chemistry 1

    Associate Professor Gwen Lawrie

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

    A/Professor Gwen Lawrie is a teaching-focussed academic in SCMB and Director of first year chemistry (curriculum and assessment). While A/Professor Lawrie teaches in first, second and third year chemistry, she has a particular interest in transitions from high school to tertiary studies as well as learning progressions across the curriculum. Gwen completed a postgraduate diploma in secondary education and taught in high schools for a year; this experience has had a major influence on her practice. A/Professor Lawrie's teaching philosophy and strategies have been recognised through faculty, institutional and national awards for inclusive practices and the respect she has for students, and in 2107 she was recognised as a Senior Fellow Of the Higher Education Academy.

    This level 1 chemistry service course is scheduled into multiple programs of study (including BSc, BBiotech, BBiomed Sci, BEng, BPharm, BHealth Sci, BENS and dual programs). It is the first core tertiary chemistry course and topics are taught in 3 modules: module 1 (atomic structure, bonding, molecular geometry, hybridisation and intro to organic chemistry); module 2 (kinetic theory of gases, intermolecular forces, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, equilibrium) and module 3 (solution equilibria, solubility, redox chemistry). With 2 parallel lecture streams involving multiple lecturers, the content is structured so that all streams move at the same pace (many students have to attend more than one stream due to timetable clashes). PowerPoint is used as the platform but the content is structured to encourage active learning.

    A/Professor Lawrie has substantial experience in teaching very large classes (up to 500 students) and she tries to incorporate multimodal strategies to give students multiple ways that they can engage with chemistry concepts. To achieve this, she incorporates visual representations through structural models, simulations and demonstrations as well as connecting to real world examples. Gwen also makes sure there are at least two 'in-class' problems that students are encouraged to attempt (with or without clickers), so that they have a chance to apply the concepts that they have just encountered as well as gain feedback from her modelled answer (using the visualiser).

    Like everyone, I have good days and bad days so forgive the latter! I am also happy to receive advice so if you spot something I could do better; please share
    :-)

    Book your Lecture

  • ECON1310 - Quantitative Economic & Business Analysis A

    Mr Carl Sherwood

    School of Economics

    ECON1310 is a large (500+ student) course that explores basic statistical concepts and techniques that are useful in business and economic contexts. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, theoretical distributions, inferential statistics (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing) and simple linear regression.

    Carl Sherwood is a lecturer in the School of Economics who has received numerous teaching awards, including an Australian National Award for Teaching Excellence (2017), UQ Award for Teaching Excellence (2015) and an Australian National Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning (2013). He is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK). With a background as a civil engineer, an MBA and a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education from UQ, Carl aims to inspire students to learn through interactive, contextualised teaching that motivates students to understand the linkages between theory and real world situations. Students experience interactive lectures, tutorials, peer-assisted study sessions and a range of online materials (including videos and quizzes) to support their learning.

    Book your Lecture

  • EDUC3004 - Supportive Classroom Environment

    Sue Monsen

    School of Human Movement & Nutrition Science

    EDUC3004 Supportive Classroom Environments is a class for 3rd Year Bachelor of Health, Sport and Physical Education [Hons] students on their journey to become secondary school HPE and Science teachers. This is a small class environment (approx. 45 students) where classes are delivered in an active learning style. Sue’s philosophy is to model a range of pedagogies and teaching tools that could be useful in schools. The key course content is behaviour management, questioning and feedback for learning, and working with children with special needs.

    Students attend lectures, tutorials, are involved in multiple professional experience placements in schools and UQ’s Motor Active Program for children with movement difficulties. Active learning strategies (for small classes) are used in tutorials.

    Sue is a qualified and experienced teacher who has taught in teacher education at UQ for many years. Her expertise is in pedagogy and Physical Education. She is also the Professional Experience Coordinator for the BHSPE (Hons) Program.

    Book your Lecture

  • ENGG1100 - Introduction to Engineering Design

    A/Profs Lydia Kavanagh and Carl Reidsema

    Chemical Engineering School, Civil Engineering School, Information Technology & Electrical  Engineering School, Mechanical & Mining Engineering School

    ENGG1100, Introduction to Engineering Design, has been specifically designed to enable students to experience what it is to be an engineer. In teams of six, students meet each week to tackle a multi-disciplinary design-prototype-build project and apply the engineering design and management processes that they are learning through active lectures and a flipped classroom. ENGG1100 is designed to welcome students to the community of engineering practice, give them tools and skills to use in their degree program and in industry, and to stimulate their thinking about professional issues that they will face as a graduate engineer.

    Students attend lectures, workshops, seminar sessions and project session each week. Visitors are welcome to attend any of the lectures or workshops to see some of the teaching and learning strategies being used in this course. The large scale active learning sessions with 600 students in the UQ Centre are open to observers on a Monday, or you could visit one of the back to back lectures on a Wednesday.

    Associate Professors Lydia Kavanagh and Carl Reidsema lead a teaching team of approximately 70 staff to deliver ENG1100. Lydia is the Director of First Year Engineering and Carl is the EAIT Director of Teaching and Learning. Both coordinators provide innovative leadership with initiatives including: the Special Interest Group in Engineering Education (SIGEE), the PETS (Proactively Ensuring Team Success) process, the Flipped classroom project, and Learning pathway project. They have both received awards at the institutional and national level for teaching excellence and in 2017 Lydia became a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

    This course has required a heavy investment in technology enabled learning. For more information please visit the eLIPSE Centre Web page: https://www.elipse.uq.edu.au/

    Book your Lecture                Book your Workshop

  • ENGL2070 - 21st Century World Literatures

    Dr Judith Seaboyer

    School of Communication and Arts

    Dr Judith Seaboyer has taught courses at UQ from the large first-year gateway through to advanced undergraduate and honours. Her research is in contemporary responses to classical and Renaissance pastoral and in encouraging students to read more and better.

    Judith has developed an effective course design (including a flipped classroom), to improve the quality and quantity of student reading of complex and at times confrontational literary texts for a number of courses in literary studies. She is a former winner of a national citation for Excellence in Teaching, a UQ Award for Excellence in Teaching and has received a UQ citation for improving student reading.

    This advanced undergraduate course introduces students to examples of the contemporary novel in English from the United Kingdom and the United States. The authors studied are Mohsin Hamid (UK and Pakistan), Ian McEwan (UK), Ali Smith (UK), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigeria and US) Barbara Kingsolver (US), and Jonathan Franzen (US). As her students consider particular literary themes that have surfaced and/or resurfaced in the first decade of the twenty-first century, and the kinds of social and political work done by fictions like those on this course, their critical researches will be framed according to several ways of reading our texts in all their “variousness, possibility, complexity and difficulty” (Lionel Trilling, The Liberal Imagination [1950]). They will:

    • Think about reading fiction as an ethical activity and ask, to reword W. H. Auden, whether writing makes anything happen
    • Examine how literary language functions in these novels,
    • Consider the power of words
    • Consider a range of contemporary theoretical approaches as they illuminate our specific texts.

    This advanced undergraduate course attracts students majoring in literary studies as well as students seeking to enrich their programs in disciplines such as law, music, and the sciences. Enrolments are around 70. The course is (gently) flipped in that feedback-rich quizzes ensure students read primary and secondary materials before class. This means they come to lectures and tutorials ready for discussions and to read more critically. Surveys show student reading has increased exponentially since this teaching method was introduced.

    Judith uses large-class engagement strategies so classes are more interactive. The one hour and twenty minutes is a mixture of lecture, discussion and student activities that allow students to assimilate what has been talked about and to explore new skills together. Students are very talkative in the lecture space, and will engage in small- and large-group discussion, which surprises tutors new to the course.

    Week 2: Lecture on Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist
    Week 7: Lecture of Barbara Kingsolver’s The Lacuna
    Week 9: Lecture on Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom

    Book your Lecture

  • GEOM2000/7000 - Introduction to Earth Observation Sciences

    Professor Stuart Phinn

    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    The aim of GEOM2000/7000 is to introduce the fundamentals of Remote Sensing by explaining and applying selected elements from light interaction theory, image data: collection - processing - analysis, map generation and accuracy assessment.

    The goals are achieved through (1) understanding of the lecture content and related reading material, (2) active participation of a field trip, (3) development of practical image analysis and processing skills in Practicals, and (4) synthesis of and reflection on achieved knowledge in compilation of assignments and an exam or a remote sensing application review.

    Stuart Phinn’s research interests are in measuring and monitoring environmental changes using earth observation data and publishing/sharing ecosystem data. He is a professor of Geography at the University of Queensland where he teaches remote sensing and he has established and co-directs the Remote Sensing Research Centre, Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and Australian Earth Observation Coordination Group. Most recently he was the founding director of Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network and its Associate Science Director.

    He received his PhD from the University of California – Santa Barbara/San Diego State University in 1997. The majority of his work uses images collected from satellite and aircraft, in combination with field measurements, to map and monitor the Earth’s environments and how they are changing over time. A large part of this is in coastal and marine environments with C.Roelfsema. This work is done in collaboration with other environmental scientists, government environmental management agencies, NGO’s and private companies. A growing part of this work now focuses on national coordination of Earth observation activities and the collection, publishing and sharing of ecosystem data. Professor Phinn publishes extensively with his collaborators, and currently has 153 papers in refereed international journals, 1 book, and 11 book chapters.

    A large part of this work also involves training the next generation of scientists and managers who effectively use remote sensing, and he has graduated 36 PhD students. Stuart is a very engaging speaker who enjoys doing a range of things when teaching to keep his students' learning active.

    Book your Lecture

  • GEOS6001 - Research Philosophy, Design & Implementation

    Professor Stuart Phinn

    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    This course provides a transition between undergraduate training and the research required for a postgraduate thesis or dissertation as part of Honours research. The approach is to provide basic insights into the essentials of research design and management. A large part of the course deals with the practical aspects of thesis construction and academic writing, along with skills generic to research and general project design, implementation and management.

    The content objective of the course is to develop an understanding of the nature of scientific and non-scientific research in geography, planning, and environmental management, and the necessity for project design and time management. The process objective is to develop skills to enable you to identify a significant research or applied problem, and then obtain relevant literature and design a research or project methodology to collect and analyse data for addressing the problem. The research design and implementation stage will involve selection and critical assessment of relevant literature, development of appropriate data collection and analysis strategies, formulation of research objectives and hypotheses, generation of task lists and project timelines, and identification of limitations and outputs from the research process.

    The course is delivered as a series of interactive workshops in weeks 1-6, 7, 9 and 13.

    Stuart Phinn’s research interests are in measuring and monitoring environmental changes using earth observation data and publishing/sharing ecosystem data. He is a professor of Geography at the University of Queensland where he teaches remote sensing and he has established and co-directs the Remote Sensing Research Centre, Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and Australian Earth Observation Coordination Group. Most recently he was the founding director of Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network and its Associate Science Director.

    He received his PhD from the University of California – Santa Barbara/San Diego State University in 1997. The majority of his work uses images collected from satellite and aircraft, in combination with field measurements, to map and monitor the Earth’s environments and how they are changing over time. A large part of this is in coastal and marine environments with C.Roelfsema. This work is done in collaboration with other environmental scientists, government environmental management agencies, NGO’s and private companies. A growing part of this work now focuses on national coordination of Earth observation activities and the collection, publishing and sharing of ecosystem data. Professor Phinn publishes extensively with his collaborators, and currently has 153 papers in refereed international journals, 1 book, and 11 book chapters.

    A large part of this work also involves training the next generation of scientists and managers who effectively use remote sensing, and he has graduated 36 PhD students. Stuart is a very engaging speaker who enjoys doing a range of things when teaching to keep his students learning active

    Book your Interactive Workshop 

  • LAWS3101 - Income Tax Law

    Dr Thea Voogt

    School of Law

    Dr Thea Voogt won the overall BEL Teaching Award for 2017 for her teaching in Income Tax Law, a compulsory course for most commerce students, with a cohort of 300 students per semester. She is an inspiring, engaged teacher who applies an innovative, personalised, student-centred, technology-driven collaborative learning approach in LAWS3101. Her pedagogical philosophy of Ubuntu – I am because we are – has made a significant and unique contribution to teaching the law to commerce students in three ways: engaging effectively and respectfully one-on-one with students in a large group setting; facilitating structured, inquiry-based learning through a comprehensive mixed-methods approach to enhance the quality of student learning in a highly technical, ever-changing Australian country-specific subject; inspiring students to learn through her demonstrable commitment to income tax law in this CA ANZ tertiary-accredited course, deep engagement with quality collaborative learning, and by breaking down cultural and communication barriers in a diverse student group, the majority of whom are international students.

    The course is delivered through interactive, practical lectures of two hours each week, after which students practice the application of the law in tutorial classes. Thea was also awarded the TC Beirne Law School prize for the best teaching of a compulsory law course in 2015 and the TC Beirne School of Law prize for the most inspiring teacher in 2016. 

    Book your Lecture

  • LAWS5215 - Civil Procedure

    Dr Kai Luck

    School of Law

    Dr Luck lectures in Equity and Trusts Law, Civil Procedure and Commercial Law at The University of Queensland. Prior to joining the Law School, Kai worked as a Senior Associate at several top-tier international law firms, most recently US firm Jones Day, with his practice concentrating on corporate law, corporate governance, insolvency and commercial litigation and arbitration. Kai is a member of the Corporations Law Committees of the Law Council of Australia and the Queensland Law Society and is a regular contributor to industry seminars, conferences and publications.

    Dr Luck has received consistently positive feedback from his students for delivering practical, relevant material in a ‘user friendly’ fashion. He focuses on breaking down the stigma and complexity of the law by encouraging an engaging, cooperative and friendly learning environment in which students can understand difficult legal concepts and expand their learningLAWS5215 Civil Procedure concerns some of the key skills required for the practice of law. It equips students with the tools to commence, conduct and conclude civil litigation in the common law adversarial system. Course content focuses on the rules, principles and procedures of civil litigation operating in Queensland – though some time is dedicated to comparing and contrasting the Queensland system against those operating in other jurisdictions, both in Australia and internationally.

    Civil Procedure has intellectual and practical aspects. Students are introduced to a wide range of topic areas relevant to each stage of civil litigation. These areas include: the commencement of proceedings, the concept and operation of jurisdiction, identification of parties and causes of action, service and disclosure of documents, pleadings, alternative dispute resolution, pre-trial applications and the civil trial. Building on an intellectual foundation, students will be introduced to practical tools and resources such as court forms and example pleadings, and will gain an in-depth knowledge of the Uniform Civil Procedure Rules (Qld) (‘UCPR(Q)’) and other important resources in the area.

    Assessment focuses on putting civil procedure knowledge into practice through, for example, mastering the UCPR(Q), drafting legal documents, making strategic decisions on case management, and working through a hypothetical case. Opportunities will be provided for critical reflection on civil procedure in Queensland. For instance, throughout this course students will consider the role of costs, a lawyer’s various obligations, and the sometimes challenging aim of balancing justice, efficiency and fairness in civil proceedings.  

    Book your Lecture

  • MATH1051 - Calculus & Linear Algebra 1

    Dr Poh Hillock

    School of Mathematics and Physics

    MATH1051 is the first uni-level mathematics course at UQ with a yearly enrolment exceeding 1500, and services more than 45 programs at UQ. The course provides an important foundation in calculus and linear algebra that will be useful for further studies in pure and applied sciences, engineering, finance or further mathematics pursuits.

    Dr Poh Wah Hillock is a lecturer in mathematics and is passionate about the teaching and learning of first year mathematics. She has published in both mathematics and mathematics education journals and has won teaching awards at both institutional and national levels.

    Poh uses a variety of techniques to engage her students in lectures, including:

    • Questioning techniques
    • Demonstrations using technology
    • UQ active learning tools e.g. Wordcloud & UQPoll (she is hoping to try Padlet this semester!).
    • Cartoons
    • Physical models

    Book your Lecture

  • MECH2410 - Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

    Associate Professor Saiied Aminossadati

    School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering

    This course introduces the basic principles of fluid mechanics to second year engineering students and enables them to develop an appreciation of the design principles of fluid systems. Students learn how to examine systems with a fluid as the working medium, analyse existing and design new fluid systems, and apply engineering methods to solve complex problems. The emphasis is on the development of mathematical models for basic and complex fluid problems and apply the models in various practical applications.

    A/Prof Saiied Aminossadati began his engineering career in 1984, and qualified with BEng in 1989, MEng in 1994 and PhD in 1999. He joined The University of Queensland as an engineering lecturer in 2006. He is the leader of mine ventilation and fibre-optic sensing research at The University of Queensland and has successfully received several internal and external competitive research grants. He has established the first Heat, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Laboratory and the first Fibre-optic Sensing Application Laboratory at The University of Queensland. He has published more than 110 peer-reviewed Journal and Conference papers and given more than 40 oral presentations.

    Amini has supervised over 70 Honours and RHD students, and is currently supervising 13 PhD students and has gained international recognition for his research in thermos-fluids, underground mine ventilation and fibre-optic sensing systems. He is using his close relation with the mining industry to introduce new technologies in the industry and is collaborating with a number of national and international institutes in this field and recently organised and chaired the 2nd International OFSIS2017 Conference in Brisbane with the focus on the industrial and safety applications of fibre-optic and photonic sensors.

    A/Prof Aminossadati uses an active learning strategy in this course to motivate his students to learn and understand this critical aspect of mining. He gets great satisfaction from teaching and achieves consistently high teaching and course evaluation scores. His commitment to his students’ learning has been recognised with multiple program and teaching awards and in 2017 he achieved Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

    Visitors are welcome to attend any of Amin's lectures but if you wish to visit a tutorial [Wednesday 12 - 2 (42/115) or Thursday 9 - 11 (82D/101)] please contact him in advance.

    Book your Lecture

  • MIDW1101/MIDW2102 - Introduction to Midwifery Practice/Health Complexities in Pregnancy

    Susannah Brady

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

    MIDW1101 introduces students to the theory and practice of safe, contemporary woman-centred midwifery practice. A broad overview of each of the stages of pregnancy, labour, birth and postnatal care will be discussed with consideration of the core technical components required for a beginning level of midwifery practice. MIDW2102 provides students with an overview of some of the complexities women have in pregnancy. Some women experience complications and/or have existing medical conditions that will require specialist obstetric and multidisciplinary care. during pregnancy, labour and birth and in the postpartum period. Midwives play a pivotal role in the care process not only in delivering the necessary care but also in providing continuity and support and interfacing either directly or indirectly with all members of the multidisciplinary team. Students practice skills of monitoring, assessing and caring for mother and baby in Clincial Simulation Workshops, engage in group based learning in Inquiry Based Learning Workshops, complete independent study online and attend a series of lectures for both of these courses

    Susannah has experience in making quality contributions to teaching, learning and student engagement within the midwifery programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. She has served in leadership roles as Program Coordinator and Program Director, and in this, her key achievements are:

    • Curriculum development and introduction of the inaugural Bachelor of Midwifery in Queensland
    • Development of the transition to midwifery practice courses which allow students to transfer between the undergraduate degree programs
    • Contribution to the development of courses in the Masters of Midwifery program which will assist in preparing midwives for eligibility status.

    The quality of Susannah’s teaching and scholarly activity within the school was recognised when she received a “high commendation” for teaching excellence as an individual, and a “citation” for outstanding contribution to student learning for her role in the team of midwives who developed the content for the Masters of Midwifery Degree. Susannah has over 10 years teaching in the PBL format in all year levels of the bachelor of Midwifery Program. She is also known for her engaging midwifery lectures, where she uses storytelling from her own clinical practice experiences to illustrate key points for students.

    Book Clinical Simulation Workshop (Mater Hospital)             Book Inquiry Based Learning Workshop (St Lucia Campus)

  • MGTS1301 - Introduction to Management

    Dr Geoff Greenfield & Dr Cle-Anne Gabriel

    School of Business

    MGTS1301 provides students with an introductory learning experience in business management by critically exploring management principles, concepts, models, and challenges from both a national and international perspective. Through this exploration of management, students develop an understanding of the broad areas of planning, organising, leading, and controlling, spanning classical to contemporary approaches to management thinking. The course runs as interactive lectures, team-based tutorials, and experiential learning through the use of a computer simulation.

    We run a three hour experiential learning activity for up to 100 students that uses a computer simulation, which in itself is a challenge to organise and run. Specifically, the timetabling and organisation of this activity has developed over time to extent that we can get over 700 students through the simulation in one day. However, students tell us that they enjoy the activity and the linking of it to assessment.

    Cle-Anne Gabriel is the Course Coordinator and Lecturer. She has a PhD in Management and teaches large classes of over 500 students. She has an interactive teaching style and believes ‘fun’ and interesting subject matter are important to student motivation, engagement and learning.

    Geoff Greenfield has a PhD in information systems and has been in academic roles for 15 years. He recently completed his Graduate Certificate in Higher Education. He believes our role as educators is to provide an environment where students can develop and learn, not only the hard skills relevant to their discipline, but also the soft skills that employers are looking for in the business market. Geoff played a crucial role in the adoption and development of the Everest Simulation in MGTS1301, and will coordinate this year’s sessions.

    Book Lecture 1 (Saturday 10th March)             Book Lecture 2 

  • MGTS3301 - Business Policy and Strategy

    Dr April Wright

    School of Business

    MGTS3301 provides a capstone learning experience for final-year business students by building upon foundational knowledge about business management that students have acquired in previous core courses and upon more specialist expertise developed in their major area(s) of study. Students apply concepts, tools, and frameworks relevant to strategy formulation and implementation to business cases and simulations to analyse how firms can create a sustainable competitive advantage in dynamic environments. Through this application and analysis, students develop a more integrated and ethically responsible understanding of the relationships between strategy and firm performance measured by financial and non-financial indicators.

    The course is run as interactive seminars in which students are expected to:
    (1) arrive fully prepared by reviewing course materials (readings, lecture slides/recordings etc.) prior to attending class;
    (2) actively engage as self-managed learners and collaborate with students from other majors to develop a functionally-integrated understanding of business strategy and its practice; and
    (3) display levels of professional competence in communication and teamwork required of business graduates as future leaders.

    Each three hour seminar has up to 108 students which in itself it is a challenge to organise and run. The flipped classroom design of the course places a greater requirement on the students to come to class prepared, however, they participate to a greater extent than in a traditional class environment. To best appreciate the course design, the best weeks to visit are weeks 3, 4,5 and 7 for the Management Team Meetings and weeks 9 and 10 for the simulations.

    April Wright is an Associate Professor in the UQ Business School, with over 20 years of university teaching experience. She won a UQ Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013 and has received national recognition for her teaching and learning work in large business courses, including the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management 'Management Educator of the Year' in 2011 and a national citation in the Australian Awards for University Teaching in 2013. April is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Management Education and her research in management education has been published in leading journals and presented at national and international conferences.

    Book your Seminar

  • MKTG7961 - Agribusiness Marketing

    Dr Phil Currey

    School of Agriculture and Food Sciences

    The effectiveness of marketing food and fibre products is important to the viability of Australian agribusiness and the profitability of individual firms within this important sector of our economy. This course examines the principles of marketing and provides practical examples of how those principles should be and are applied by Australian agribusinesses.

    Phil Currey joined UQ with more than 30 years of agribusiness experience as a management consultant specialising in agribusiness marketing and as a senior executive in national and multinational agribusiness organisations. He is an experienced advisor to primary producers, food processors, value-adders, business founders, owners, directors and senior management teams. Phil has helped agribusiness owners establish a wide range of agri-food products into domestic and export markets. His experience includes more than 400 individual consultancy projects including extensive international travel for market research, negotiating orders on behalf of clients, selecting and appointing distributors, establishing international offices and negotiating joint ventures.

    Students appreciate the practical industry experience that Phil brings into the classroom and the relaxed style with which he engages with students. The first week is spent exploring how students learn and discovering why the course is presented in the way it is. Students attend the lecture that introduces the topic, then self-direct study until the tutorial when they discuss practical applications of the theory being discussed during the week in small groups.

    Book your Lecture

  • NUMW1102 - Professional Practice 1

    Susannah Brady

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

    This course introduces foundational knowledge and skills related to providing safe and high quality care in a person-centred environment. It involves developing a professional identity and sense of self as a professional nurse or midwife, developing safe clinical skills,therapeutic communication skills and developing beginner clinical decision-making skills. Students also begin to develop skills in using evidence to inform practice. The course content is delivered using flipped classroom teaching approaches in clinical workshops, theoretical workshop sessions, online learning activities and self-directed learning.

    Susannah has experience in making quality contributions to teaching, learning and student engagement within the midwifery programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. She has served in leadership roles as Program Coordinator and Program Director, and in this, her key achievements are:

    • Curriculum development and introduction of the inaugural Bachelor of Midwifery in Queensland
    • Development of the transition to midwifery practice courses which allow students to transfer between the undergraduate degree programs
    • Contribution to the development of courses in the Masters of Midwifery program which will assist in preparing midwives for eligibility status.

    The quality of Susannah’s teaching and scholarly activity within the school was recognised when she received a “high commendation” for teaching excellence as an individual, and a “citation” for outstanding contribution to student learning for her role in the team of midwives who developed the content for the Masters of Midwifery Degree. Susannah has over 10 years teaching in the PBL format in all year levels of the bachelor of Midwifery Program. She is also known for her engaging midwifery lectures, where she uses storytelling from her own clinical practice experiences to illustrate key points for students.

    Book Clinical Simulation Workshop (Mater Hospital)             Book Inquiry Based Learning Workshop (St Lucia Campus)

  • PHYL2730 - Exercise Physiology

    Associate Professor David Jenkins

    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

    Associate Professor David Jenkins is a Level D Exercise Physiologist who has worked at UQ for 26 years. He has been awarded an ALTC Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning for 'sustained excellence in teaching exercise science to large undergraduate classes with a focus on social and professional engagement'. David has been the principal advisor to 20 graduated RHD students. He has published 150 papers and has an H-index of 34 (Web of Science).

    David's teaching style enables him to connect with his students, even when there are around 400 in the class. He uses humour and anecdotes to communicate contemporary knowledge of both exercise and nutrition for fitness and health to his students.

    These are old school 'chalk and talk' lectures done particularly well.

    Book your Lecture

  • PHYS1001 - Mechanics & Thermal Physics 1

    Professors Tamara Davis & Andrew White

    School of Maths and Physics

    PHYS1001 is the first 'mainstream physics' course for students intending to complete a BSc focussing on physics or students in other disciplines who want to have a thorough grounding in physics. PHYS1001 lectures do not follow the traditional lecture style. Instead students are engaged in active learning, where they become active participants in the lectures. Individual students respond with wireless response units ('clickers'). PHYS1001 has over 200 students enrolled.

    Professor Tamara Davis and Professor Andrew White have exceptional reputations for both their teaching and research. Both are Vice Chancellor’s Teaching and Research Fellows. Professor White is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, and was previously an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow. Professor Davis received the Australian Academy of Science’s 2015 Nancy Millis Medal, and was the 2014 Astronomical Society of New Zealand Beatrice Hill Tinsley Lecturer & the 2011 Australian Institute of Physics Women in Physics Lecturer.

    PHYS1001 is known for enthusiastic lectures combined with a new active learning environment which has resulted in lively classroom debates with a cohort that has developed a genuine thirst for a conceptual understanding of physics.

    Professor White teaches the first half of the course, Professor Davis the second half.

    Book your Lecture

  • PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology

    Associate Professor Mark Nielsen

    School of Psychology

    This course provides an introduction to lifespan developmental psychology, emphasising recent theory and research. It is not possible to cover all aspects of human lifespan development within any one course, and so lectures will feature key issues, sometimes focusing on some age ranges more than others, but using examples from other ages. Throughout, the course will emphasise developmental psychology as a research discipline. Students will learn to understand and think critically about theoretical issues and empirical research and to communicate this understanding.

    Delivery consists of a standard lecture format and accompanying tutorials. Visitors to the course will observe the lecturer using a range of strategies to engage the students including the acting out of examples of experiments, and the use of UQWordCloud, UQWordStream and UQPoll as mechanisms to interact with students in class.

    Mark Nielsen is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology and Deputy Head of the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland, and a Senior Research Associate of the University of Johannesburg.

    Mark has studied a range of inter-related aspects of socio-cognitive development in young human children and nonhuman primates, with his research primarily focused on charting the origins and development of the human cultural mind. He is also interested in how culture shapes the way children develop and has set up field sites in remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory and Southern Africa. A/Prof Nielsen has published over 50 articles and is an associate editor of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.

    Mark's lectures in this course are:
    March 12 – Development in a cross-cultural context
    March 19 – Pretending, Theory of Mind and Autism
    April 16 – Religion and development
    April 30 – Media exposur

    Book your Lecture

  • PSYC3010 - Psychological Research Methods III

    Professor Winnifred Louis

    School of Psychology

    Winnifred R. Louis (PhD McGill, 2001) is a Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland. Her research interests focus on the influence of identity and norms on social decision-making. She has studied this broad topic in contexts from politics and community activism to health and environmental choices. Winnifred has won a 2016 UQ Award for Excellence in Research Higher Degree Supervision, a 2012 honourable mention for the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award, nomination by UQ in 2012 for Australian Teaching Excellence Awards, a 2011 University of Queensland Award for Teaching Excellence, a 2010 University of Queensland Commendation for Teaching Excellence, the 2009 Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (University of Queensland) Teaching Excellence Award; and a 2008 Pearson Education and Australian Psychological Society Early Career Teaching Award (a national award).

    Psychology – research methods. This third year course is required and builds on two previous courses. It covers multivariate statistics – factorial ANOVA (between/mixed/within) and multiple regression (including mediation and moderation). Delivery is lecture-based with a weekly tute in weeks 2-12. There are many online activities and assessments throughout the term. The tute supports the assignments with a focus on learning SPSS (a computer stats software) and how to generate analyses from hypotheses and then interpret the results.

    Academics are welcome at any time. The lectures in weeks 1 and 13 have more admin, so weeks 2-12 are your best bet for intense stats material. May 7 (Labour day) classes are cancelled. Weeks 2-4 are on ANOVA (distinguishing differences between groups) and weeks 6-9 are on regression (distinguishing associations between continuous variables). There are in class quizzes in weeks 3, 4, 7, 8 and 9 which will create interesting logistical chaos but reduce the content covered. Depending on your interests (and own previous stats knowledge) the tutes may be more watchable; you would need to check with Winnifred so that she can tee up the tutors.

    I have experimented with a lot of large class management techniques like using technology, questions and active learning. I welcome all feedback and suggestions from peers as I wrestle with the challenge of maintaining attendance in my classes (usually drops to <30% by the end of the semester!). Managing the diversity of expectations and skills is also hard (statistical enjoyment in psychology is pretty polarized, with a smaller group of tolerant learners and keeners and a larger group of warm-hearted nurturing types who did not sign up for psychology for number games, thank you very much). So I’m looking forward to your great ideas.

    Book your Lecture

  • RELN1001 - Belief and Unbelief

    Associate Professor Neil Pembroke

    School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry

    Belief and Unbelief is a gateway course which covers philosophical, theological, psychological, and science-based arguments for and against belief in God. It is taught by Associate Professor Neil Pembroke, from the discipline of Studies in Religion, who has been teaching at UQ for 12 years. His teaching interests include Jung and Human Spirituality, Religion and Health, Mysticism, Psychology of Religion, and Religion and the Psychotherapies. Neil was Director of Teaching and Learning for the School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry for 4 years, and during that time instigated a pilot program using the flipped classroom.

    A/Professor Pembroke uses a flipped classroom approach from Week 3 on to teach this course and suggests that visitors should come between 10.30 and 11:30 for the opportunity to see Padlet and the flipped model in action. 

    Book your Lecture

  • SCIE1000 - Theory and Practice in Science

    Professors Peter Adams and Peter O'Donoghue

    School of Biological Sciences, School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences, School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry, School of Information Technology & Electrical Engineering, School of Mathematics & Physics

    SCIE1000, Theory and Practice in Science, is a foundation course in science that introduces students to the broad range of mathematical, analytical, conceptual and computational tools employed by scientists to develop, analyse and interpret models of scientific processes. This course currently has over 800 students enrolled to participate in weekly lectures and tutorials. The lectures assume pre-readings and aim to develop understanding through discussion (as a whole class and in small groups) and problem solving. The tutorials provide opportunities for students to work through problems individually and in small groups with tutors providing personalised help.

    SCIE1000 is jointly taught by academic staff from three faculties: Science (Peter Adams, Peter O’Donoghue, Christine Beveridge, Anthony Richardson), EAIT (Marcus Gallagher) and HASS (Peter Ellerton and Joel Katzav). Most lectures are delivered jointly by Peter Adams and Peter O'Donoghue. Both have received national recognition for their teaching excellence, winning teaching awards and leading national teaching projects. Peter O'Donoghue is a previous winner of the Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in teaching, and Peter Adams is Associate Dean Academic for the Science faculty. This group of teachers have excellent reputations amongst staff and students based on their dedication, passion and talent for teaching.

    Book your Lecture

  • SOSC2288/7288 - Community Development - Local and International Practices

    Dr Lynda Shevellar

    School of Social Science

    The course provides an introduction to community development within a broader framework of approaches to development, emphasising a rights-based approach, participatory processes and sustainability. Students will have the opportunity to develop the basic skills and conceptual knowledge required to engage with diverse community groups, particularly those who are frequently adversely affected by growth-based development approaches. Students will be challenged to critically reflect on key professional and ethical issues facing practitioners working at local, national and global levels. The course provides an excellent platform upon which to pursue other undergraduate or postgraduate studies in CD.

    SOSC7288 is double-badged with the undergraduate course SOSC2288. This means that the course is co-taught to two cohorts. And while students attend classes together, share resources, activities and discussions, postgraduate students are required to engage and perfom at a higher level and assessment items differ.

    Classes are designed to encourage students to become active participants in the learning process through in-class activities, debates and discussions on critical issues in community development practice. The purpose of these workshops is to create a space for people to experience different processes and to openly exchange ideas in order to deepen learning.

    Students are asked not to enrol in this course if they:

    • prefer not to come to class or have other commmitments that prevent them from being present;
    • rely heavily on PowerPoint slides and recordings of lectures to provide "the answers"; or
    • have no interest in the ideas of other people.

    These workshops require students to be active learners within the course and with each other. For some people this will be very familiar and not even worthy of mention. but for others this is a new way of learning and academic, Dr Lynda Shevellar, appreciates that they are stepping out of their comfort zone.She encourages everyone to make the most of the opportunity to engage with others and learn from the collective wisdom of the class.

    Dr Shevellar is influenced by over twenty-five years of experience and study in community development, the disability sector, education, and psychology. She has worked in government and the community sector and is currently a lecturer in Community Development. Lynda has worked extensively with community groups and organisations providing training and development, program and service development, and evaluation. Her work focuses upon the dynamics of personal, organisational and social change, with a particular interest in mental health, the ethics of mental health support work, and how to support people to belong. These interests are supported by studies in a range of intersecting fields. Lynda holds a PhD in Community Development, a Master of Education (Training and Development), a Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology, a Bachelor of Arts and a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education. Her current research focuses upon the revitalisation of popular education.

    I am particularly influenced by the action teaching work of Scott Plous (2000, cited Azar, 2008), who argues that the learning experience should lead to not only a better understanding of the subject area but to a more just, compassionate and peaceful world. Plous suggests that teaching is not just about acting and reflecting – but about doing this in ways that promote humanity. Erich Fromm (1976) argues that we experience promotion of a mode of existence based on having rather than being. Such a mode prefers the possession of objects ‘I am the more I have’, and more significantly mistakes verbs for nouns. Having a degree or having the PowerPoint slides is confused with “being” a student. The danger for educators is that we prepare students for a life of consumption by obtaining a well-paid job: a mission of confirmation rather than transformation. This course deliberately seeks to interrupt this narrative and invites students to reflect not only on the content but upon themselves as cultural actors in the creation of culture and knowledge.

    So, anyone visiting this course could expect to see examples of action teaching, student-as-teacher exercises, workshop facilitation, and reflective discussion.
      

    Book your Workshop

  • SPCH2106 - Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice    SPCH7820 - Articulation and Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice

    Dr Anne Hill

    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

    Dr Anne Hill is a speech pathologist of over 30 years experience. She has been teaching within the UQ speech pathology programs for over 10 years and has taught this particular course for the majority of that time. The focus of her research program is around scholarship of teaching and learning. Anne’s excellence in teaching has been recognised with School and faculty teaching awards and in 2015, Anne received a UQ Teaching Excellence award. Anne’s innovations in teaching focus around the use of simulated learning environments to support students’ development of critical skills for speech pathology practice. Anne is recognised as a respectful and inspiring teacher who facilitates student learning through active engagement with a range of different learning techniques and incorporation of her extensive clinical experience into lecture and activity content.

    SPCH2106 Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practice and SPCH7820 Articulation and Phonological Disorders and Clinical Practic are foundation courses within the Bachelor of Speech Pathology (Honours) Year 2 program and the Master of Speech Pathology Studies Year 1 program. They are co-taught with similar lecture content for both groups, but with different clinical practice experiences and different assessment.

    These courses focus on a key area of speech pathology practice, the assessment and management of speech sound disorders in children. The teaching and practical activities are designed to support students’ development of knowledge and skills related to this area. The courses involve a range of teaching and assessment activities, including face to face lectures focussing on background information and key strategies for understanding the clinical process, video case-based teaching, and in class learning activities focussed on practical aspects of speech sound assessment, analysis and interpretation, and intervention planning. Dr Hill makes excellent use of video and anecdotal examples from her clinical experience to support students’ understanding of concepts and application. She uses learning techniques such as open questioning, summarising learning in short chunks and respectful engagement with her students. 

    Book Lecture 1 (Thursdays)         Book Lecture 2 (Fridays)

  • TOUR7052 - Travel Distribution and Transport Systems

    Dr Pierre Benckendorff

    School of Business

    TOUR7052 acquaints students with international, regional and local transport modes, networks and patterns, passenger flows and regulation. This course has been developed using a 'flipped teaching' model in the form of blended learning that includes the use of technology to leverage learning during class time, so the lecturer can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing. Students spend their class time working in teams on a simulation or problem-based learning activities. TOUR7052 is a small postgraduate coursework subject with about 90 students.

    A range of technologies (padlet, simulation, online lectures) are used and students work their way through authentic learning experiences aligned to the assessment. The best dates for visits would be review weeks (when the students use padlet to generate questions about the course content) and practice weeks (when students apply their learning by working on problem-based learning activities). Review weeks are weeks 2, 5 and 11. Application weeks are weeks 3, 6, 9 and 12.

    Dr Pierre Benckendorff has more than 15 years experience in education and research in the tourism field. His passion for travel and tourism has taken him to some of the world’s leading theme parks and airports, the major cities of Europe and North America, the African Savannah and the bustling streets of Asia. He has also travelled extensively throughout Australia and New Zealand. His research interests include visitor behaviour, tourism information technologies, and tourism education and training. He has authored over 80 publications in these areas in leading international journals and is a regular speaker at tourism research conferences. Pierre is actively involved in a number of national projects totalling over $700,000 in grant funding. He is on the editorial board for the Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research and is a regular reviewer of papers published in some of the world’s leading academic tourism journals.

    Pierre is also an award winning university lecturer and has held several teaching and learning leadership positions at both The University of Queensland and James Cook University. In 2007 he received a national Carrick (now Office for Learning and Teaching) citation for outstanding contributions to student learning. He has developed and taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in introductory tourism management, international tourism, tourist behaviour, tourism and leisure futures, tourism transportation, tourism operations, tourism technologies, tourism analysis, business skills and marketing communications.

    He is currently the co-chair of knowledge creation for the BEST Education Network and in this capacity has worked with the World Travel and Tourism Council to edit a book of international cases based on Tourism for Tomorrow award finalists and winners. He has also co-authored one of the leading textbooks on tourism and information technology.

    Book your Workshop