Each semester, you are invited to attend and observe a class from a selection of courses that are made 'open' to UQ staff.

  1. Search for courses using the filter below (e.g. type 'blended learning' in the bar). 
  2. Book your spot through the following links. Check our FAQs if you have any questions, or contact us.

Open-courses-scheme

Search open courses by keyword(s)

AGRC1041 Cell & Tissue Biology for Agriculture & Veterinary Science

Dr Deanne Whitworth
School of Veterinary Science

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour lecture and 2-hour practical
  • Level: undergraduate first year
  • Size: large (approx. 150–170)

AGRC1041 is a biomedical science course that integrates the structure of cells and tissues with their function.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: traditional lectures – digital learning and microscopy – virtual microscopy – tutorial videos – interactive digital learning material – weekly practical quizzes.

Lecturer's short bio

Dee Whitworth is a teaching and research-focused academic in the School of Veterinary Science with research interests in the biology and therapeutic applications of stem cells, and developmental biology in marsupials and monotremes.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 12–2pm, Thu 4–5pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1, 3–9, 10, 12, 13
  • Location: Mon 8255–105, Thu via Zoom (Zoom link provided upon registration)
  • Note: this is at Gatton campus

Practical

  • Days and times: Wed 12pm-2pm, 2pm-4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 4-13
  • Location: 8106-213

ARCS2070 Bioarchaeology: Human Remains and Ancient Disease

Dr Glenys McGowan
School of Social Science

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour lecture + 2-hour practical all face-to-face
  • Level: undergraduate
  • Size: medium (approx. 50)

This course teaches human osteology and palaeopathology to archaeology students, most of whom have an Arts and Humanities background.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: gamification of learning – group collaborative learning

To assist with learning a large amount of new terminology and complex content, the course practicals incorporate games/active quizzes. Students compete as teams in the weekly pub-quiz style activity.

Lecturer's short bio

Glenys McGowan is a teaching-focused academic who spends approximately 300 hours in the classroom each year. She teaches first and second-year undergraduate courses and is the School of Social Science Honours Convenor. In 2016, she received the HASS Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence. Glenys employs object-based learning and authentic learning scenarios, and maintains student interest through the use of humour and popular culture references.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 10am–12noon
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–13
  • Location: 50–N201

Practical

  • Days and times: Mon 1–3pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 11
  • Location: 9–325
  • Note: The room is a laboratory space, so visitors need to tie long hair back and wear shoes that cover the toes, heels and tops of the feet.

CHEM2060 Intermediate Chemistry 2

Prof Gwen Lawrie
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour lectorials weekly + combination of workshops and practicals
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 70)

This course is required in the chemistry and chemical sciences majors and serves as an elective for students in many other majors and programs. It requires first-year chemistry preparation.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: multimodal representations – active learning – in-class problem solving and discussion

Gwen teaches by guiding students to think about their thinking. Learning chemistry requires the development of mental models of what molecules look like and how they interact with each other. The focus is on using diverse representational modes in chemistry and developing students' skills in translating between these. She aims to facilitate student learning as part of an inclusive classroom and community.

Lecturer's short bio

Gwen Lawrie is a teaching-focused academic. She has an active research program into supporting and assessing student self-regulated learning in online environments in parallel with how teachers combine multimodal representations in teaching. Gwen is a Senior Fellow of the HEA and has been recognised by multiple national, professional and institutional teaching awards.

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Lectorial

  • Days and times: Mon 11am–12noon, Tues 12noon–1pm,
  • 'Open' weeks: Weeks 4–7
  • Location: 50–N202

Workshop

  • Days and times: Wed 12noon–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 4, 6
  • Location: 69–ILC3

ECON2030 Microeconomic Policy

A/Prof Ian MacKenzie
School of Economics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2 hour-lecture + 1 hour-tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 1st/2nd year
  • Size: large (400 students)

Extends microeconomic theory and demonstrates application to microeconomic policy issues; welfare economics, trade practices legislation, tariff policy and public enterprises.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: interactive lectures – collaborative learning tutorials

Ian focuses on in-class games, reward-driven participation.

Lecturer's short bio

Ian MacKenzie is a teaching and research-focused academic with AAUT award and UQ citations.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 10am–12noon
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 4–9, 10–12
  • Location: 63–358

 

EDUC7059 Foundation of the Science of Learning

Dr Stephanie Macmahon
School of Education

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour lecture + workshop
  • Level: postgraduate
  • Size: small (approx. 30)

This course explores the philosophical underpinnings and key ideas from the science of learning, and how the principles can be effectively applied to practice in diverse learning contexts.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – hybrid – collaborative – reflective of the science of learning principles – student engagement – application to practice.

A flipped approach that encourages independent and collaborative online engagement, with emphasis on applying learning to diverse contexts.

Lecturer's short bio

Steph is a teaching-focused academic in the School of Education, with 20 years of experience in the School of Education, and eight years in tertiary. As the Science of Learning Field of Study Coordinator, and Program Director for the SLRC Learning Lab, Steph engages deeply in the multi-disciplinary literature around how people learn, the factors that affect learning, and how this evidence can be applied to pedagogical practice in school, higher education and adult learning contexts, drawing on her extensive experience in a range of education contexts.

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Lecture/workshop

  • Days and times: Monday 4–6pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–4; 6–9; 11–13
  • Location: Zoom link provided upon registration

 

EDUC7212 Educational Research Methods

A/Prof Ian Hardy
School of Education

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour contact Zoom and face-to-face, synchronous
  • Level: postgraduate
  • Size: medium (approx. 130)

This course is about conducting education research in a socially-responsive, critically-conscious and ethically-responsible way to help inform education policy and practice.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – engagement during lectures – student-led workshops/tutorials

Ian actively encourages student participation/feedback during lectures. Zoom enables text responses, as well as face-to-face (synchronous). The online component varies between groups online and groups face-to-face.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof Ian Hardy researches and teaches educational policy and practice at the School of Education. Recent research has focused on datafication processes in schools and schooling systems more broadly.

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Contact

  • Days and times: Wed 4–6pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 4–9, 10–13
  • Location: 11A–101, Zoom link provided upon registration

 

EDUC7606 Building Inclusive Secondary Classrooms

A/Prof Rhonda Faragher
School of Education

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour lecture + 1-hour tutorial
  • Level: postgraduate + undergraduate 1st year
  • Size: small (approx. 40), lecture co-taught with EDUC3606 (approx. 140)

This course is designed for pre-service teacher education students to learn how to teach inclusive classes. Various areas of diversity are covered.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – interactive lectures – teaching team

Inclusive education is a challenging topic for pre-service teachers and most are anxious about their ability to teach in this complex area of teachers' work. Being a first-year course, it is also at a time in their program where many aspects of the teachers' work are new. The course aims to develop confidence and expertise through interactive lectures where content focuses on best practice evidence, interspersed with discussion and modelling.

Lecturer's short bio

Rhonda Faragher is a secondary maths and science teacher by background. She is a teaching and research-focused academic researching inclusion and diversity.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 10am–12noon
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 5–7,9,10, 13
  • Location: 01–E109

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Tue 1–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: weeks 2,5–7,9,10,13
  • Location: 17–202

ERTH2002 Palaeobiology

Dr Gilbert Price
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 5-hour contact per week + half-day field trip
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: small (40–50 students)

The course explores the history of Earth's life, from the dawn of the planet to the present. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the application of the fossil record to contemporary problems in the Earth and Biological Sciences.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – flipped classroom – blended learning – hybrid Zoom/face-to-face

Pre-pandemic, the course was previously very hands-on, combining theory and practice with real physical objects for study in every class. During the pandemic, the course shifted to a blend of online and face-to-face sessions. The online sessions substitute physical specimens for digital 3D models. The course can be taught completely in external mode, but also has a two-hour face-to-face session each week for students that wish to come to the campus. The course utilises an external WordPress-based website for learning, augmented reality, in-class interactive and live informal quizzes and surveys and a semester-specific Facebook group. All online sessions are taught live via Zoom.

Lecturer's short bio

Gilbert Price is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Unlike most colleagues, he loves Zoom and his teaching has thrived during the pandemic. His enthusiasm is driven by the challenge of adapting to online learning (he loves it so much that he even recently started a new blog aimed at helping other lecturers). The Palaeobiology course has maintained an average SECaT score of ~4.8 for the past several years including during the pandemic. He has been awarded three “Dean’s Commendations for Excellent Teaching” (a student-nominated award, Faculty of Science) for each year across the pandemic to date.

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Contact

  • Days and times: Tue 9–11am, Wed 9–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 9, 10–13
  • Location: Zoom link provided upon registration; 03–228/229
  • Note: Tuesday is Zoom only, Wednesday is hybrid teaching

LAWS2706 Foundations of Property Law

Dr Maria Dolhare
School of Law

Course overview

  • Delivery: recorded lecture + 2-hour seminar (hybrid)
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: large (approx. 250)

The course introduces law students to interests in property law such as leases, mortgages, body corporate and also covers native title at common law and under the legislation.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – blended learning – problem-based case scenarios

Face-to-face students are encouraged to participate in the usual manner. Zoom students are encouraged to participate by using reactions, chat or orally. Small breakout rooms are used for student activities. PowerPoints provide a visual aid and feedback on the seminar exercises. An interesting aspect here will be to balance the participation and engagement levels of both face-to-face and Zoom students. Zoom drop-in consultations are also available.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Dolhare is a qualified legal practitioner in Queensland teaching and researching mainly in the areas of property law, particularly real estate law or land law. As a teaching-focused academic, she is committed to adopting teaching practices that are student-centred; helping students to develop their own agency and sense of ownership regarding their professional and personal growth as lifelong learners.

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Thu 10am–12noon, 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9, 10–12
  • Location: online
  • Note: please email m.dolhare@law.uq.edu.au for the Zoom link

LAWS3101 Income Tax Law

Dr Thea Voogt
School of Law

Course overview

  • Delivery: live Zoom 2-hour lecture + face-to-face 1-hour tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate final year
  • Size: large (approx. 200), 30 per tutorial

Tax law course, accredited by professional accounting bodies. The goal is to make complex Income Tax, Fringe Benefits Tax, and GST fun and understandable to prepare students for professional exams after graduating.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: flexible asynchronous – self-regulated learning – team teaching

Induction resources are key to bridging the discipline and country context divide for her tax law novice, with a majority of international learners. 75% of them work nearly full-time. Online resources help them learn when they can (recorded lectures, daily diary, learning guides, online quizzes). Thea aims to foster belonging through newsletters and discussion boards.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Thea Voogt has won three UQ teaching awards. She brings complex Australian-specific legal content to life, proving that tax is never dull. Thea is a chartered accountant.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1, 2, 4-7, 9, 11-13
  • Location: online
  • Note: please email t.voogt@law.uq.edu.au for Zoom links.

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Tue 3–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 4-7, 9-13
  • Location: 01-W458

MATH1051 Calculus & Linear Algebra I

Mr Michael Jennings
School of Mathematics and Physics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour lecture and 2-hour weekly workshop
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Size: large (600+)

MATH1051 covers university-level mathematical concepts useful to students in a range of discipline areas, including mathematics, business, health sciences, science, applied science and engineering.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – face-to-face workshops – interactive lectures

Maths is learnt by doing. In this course we use UniDoodle, an audience response system, that lets students write equations and sketch graphs. This instantaneous feedback allows us to tailor the course appropriately.

Lecturer's short bio

Michael Jennings is an inspirational and dedicated teacher of mathematics at UQ. He teaches large first-year courses and uses his experiences in both secondary and tertiary systems to engage and inspire students. Michael has won five UQ teaching awards as well as two national awards. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Thu 10–11am, Fri 12noon–1pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–6
  • Location: Thu 49-200, Fri 50-T203, Zoom link provided upon registration

MATH1052 Multivariate Calculus & Ordinary Differential Equations

Dr Poh Hillock
School of Mathematics and Physics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour lecture + 2-hour workshop
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Size: large (approx. 800 students)

MATH1052 covers university-level mathematical concepts useful to students in a range of discipline areas, including mathematics, business, health sciences, science, applied science and engineering.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – face-to-face workshops – interactive lectures

The course has a large collection of online learning resources and many face-to-face initiatives run during the semester. These include extra help sessions, support tutorials, exam revision classes and pre-semester workshops.

Lecturer's short bio

Poh received her PhD from The University of Adelaide in the area of Convex Sets with Lattice Point Constraints. More recently, her interests have switched to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in mathematics. Poh is always on the lookout for practical ideas to help her first-year students learn mathematics. Poh has won three UQ teaching awards and a national teaching award.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Tue 10–11am, Thu 11am–12noon
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 4–9, 10–13
  • Location: 49–220, Zoom link provided upon registration

MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology

A/Prof Jack Wang
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour lecture + 3-hour practical
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: large (approx. 400)

This course covers foundational concepts in the study of microorganisms. The course content services a number of majors in the biological sciences.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: science communication – laboratory videos – blended learning – case studies

The workshops in this course are very interactive and feature case-based learning in large classes. The practical sessions are accompanied by a series of laboratory videos to allow students to prepare ahead of time, as the hands-on laboratory skillset is vital for the safe handling of potentially deadly microorganisms that microbiologists work with on a daily basis.

Lecturer's short bio

Jack is a teaching-focused academic in microbiology and has received UQ teaching awards at the school, faculty, and institutional level as well as a national Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning. His work focuses on large-scale undergraduate research as well as technology-enabled learning. He has created a number of original videos and animations for biological sciences education and leverages these resources to enable science communication to the general public.

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Thu 9–10am, Friday 9-10am
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–9, 10–13
  • Location: 50-T203

 

PHTY2220 Musculoskeletal IB (Lumbar Spine & Pelvis)

Dr Roma Forbes
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture + 1-hour of video skills + 2-hour practical
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 130)

PHTY2220 centres on students becoming patient-centred physiotherapists in the effective management of people with lower back and pelvic conditions, and those experiencing persistent pain.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – consumer-focused learning – vicarious learning – practical learning

Our approach in this course is to engage students as members of a ‘team’. Students are encouraged to bring and share their previous beliefs about pain (including how these were formed!) and share how these may develop over time as they learn new content. The content of the course is designed to be ‘patient-first’ where the patient is always at the centre.

Lecturer's short bio

Roma is a teaching-focused academic and practising clinician who brings real clinical practice into the classroom. Roma is a HERDSA, HEA and ANZAHPE Fellow and has won several awards for her teaching of this specific course (HaBS & UQ Teaching Citation, AAUT Citation, Flinders-ANZAHPE Award).

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Practical

  • Days and times: 10am–12noon or 12.30–2.30pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2-4, 8, 9, 11, 12
  • Location: 84A–312
  • Note: also available online (flexible) lectures Weeks 2–8, 11, 12. Contact r.forbes2@uq.edu.au for access.

PHTY3250 Physiotherapy Specialities: Cardiothoracics

Dr Allison Mandrusiak
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture + 1-hour weekly lecture + 2-hour weekly practical/simulation
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 120)

PHTY3250 is about helping people who have heart and lung conditions, patients in hospital after surgery, and those who are critically unwell in intensive care.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – simulations – practicals – experiential learning

Historically, cardiothoracics has been an unappealing field, a lesser-known cousin of the more famous sports or musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Students typically don’t envisage a career as a cardiothoracic physiotherapist, clearing phlegm from a patient’s lungs. This is Allison's challenge – to infuse a ‘breath of fresh air’ into learning about the lungs, and put a pulse into the heart of this course.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof Allison Mandrusiak breathes fresh life into a historically unpopular area of physiotherapy, and proves that clearing phlegm can be surprisingly fun! Her fresh approach has secured her a number of teaching awards, including UQ, national, and an international (Universitas 21) Teaching Excellence Award.

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Simulation

  • Days and times: Wed 9–10am, 1.30–2.30pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 5, 8, 9, 11
  • Location: 84A-635 (Simulation Ward)

PHTY7812 Theory, Practice & Research: Musculoskeletal Phty - Lumbar Spine

Dr Roma Forbes
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture + 1-hour of video skills + 2-hour practical class
  • Level: graduate entry Master 1st year
  • Size: small (approx. 60)

PHTY7812 centres on students becoming patient-centred physiotherapists in the effective management of people with lower back and pelvic conditions and those experiencing persistent pain.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – consumer-focused learning – vicarious learning – practical learning

Our approach in this course is to engage students as members of a ‘team’. Students are encouraged to bring and share their previous beliefs about pain (including how these were formed!) and share how these may develop over time as they learn new content. The content of the course is designed to be ‘patient-first’ where the patient is always at the centre.

Lecturer's short bio

Roma is a teaching-focused academic and practising clinician who brings real clinical practice into the classroom. Roma is a HERDSA, HEA and ANZAHPE Fellow and has won several awards for her teaching of this specific course (HaBS & UQ Teaching Citation, AAUT Citation, Flinders-ANZAHPE Award).

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Practical

  • Days and times: Thu 12–2pm, 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: Weeks 2-4, 8, 9, 11, 12
  • Location: 84A–312
  • Note: also available online (flexible) lectures Weeks 2–8, 11, 12. Contact r.forbes2@uq.edu.au for access.

PHTY7825 Physiotherapy Specialities: Cardiothoracics

Dr Allison Mandrusiak
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour weekly lecture + 1-hour weekly lecture + 2-hour weekly practical / simulation
  • Level: graduate entry Master 1st year
  • Size: small (approx. 60)

PHTY7825 is about helping people who have heart and lung conditions, patients in hospital after surgery, and those who are critically unwell in intensive care.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – simulations – practicals – experiential learning

Historically, cardiothoracics has been an unappealing field, a lesser-known cousin of the more famous sports or musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Students typically don’t envisage a career as a cardiothoracic physiotherapist, clearing phlegm from a patient’s lungs. This is Allison's challenge – to infuse a ‘breath of fresh air' into learning about the lungs, and put a pulse into the heart of this course.

Lecturer's short bio

A/Prof Allison Mandrusiak breathes fresh life into a historically unpopular area of physiotherapy, and proves that clearing phlegm can be surprisingly fun! Her fresh approach has secured her a number of teaching awards, including UQ, national, and an international (Universitas 21) Teaching Excellence Award.

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Simulation

  • Days and times: Thu 9–10am, 11am–12noon
  • 'Open' weeks: 5, 8, 9, 11
  • Location: 84A-635 (Simulation Ward)

PHYL2067 Human Function in Health & Disease B

Dr Louise Ainscough
School of Biomedical Sciences

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour independent study lecture + face-to-face lectorial
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 100)

PHYL2067 will provide an overview of human diseases in relation to physiological systems. Students will examine: 1) movement and its associated problems, 2) the role of hormones in physical disease and stress, 3) burns and pain, and 4) the absorption of nutrients and excretion of waste.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: blended learning – active learning – practical learning

Each module is supported by online lectures delivered through H5P and a face-to-face lectorial. In the lectorial, we revise key concepts using active learning (Kahoot quizzes and questioning).

Lecturer's short bio

Louise is a teaching-focused academic in the School of Biomedical Sciences. She has a keen interest in understanding students' approaches to learning. Louise is a HEA fellow and has won the Faculty of Medicine Award for Teaching Excellence.

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Lectorial

  • Days and times: Wed 10–11am
  • 'Open' weeks: 6, 10, 13
  • Location: 80–2171

POLS3102 Governance & Australian Public Policy

Dr Alastair Stark
School of Political Science and International Studies

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour workshop + 1-hour tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 2nd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 90 students)

POLS3102 is now a mandatory second-year course for second-year politics, philosophy and economics students. The course is taught as a series of mini-lectures and workshop tasks built around the classics and cutting edge of policy.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: interactive – flipped – student-centred – constructivist

Alastair delivers the course through a mix of lectures and workshop activities in class and then assesses via tutorial activities.

Lecturer's short bio

Alastair is a senior lecturer in public policy. He has no teaching awards – just a passion for teaching!

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Workshop

  • Days and times: Thu 12–2
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9, 10–13
  • Location: 11A–130

POLS3206 Policy Challenges of Asia-Pacific Security

Dr Melissa Curley
School of Political Science and International Studies

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour seminars, writing workshops, pre-recorded lectures
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 50)

POLS3206 is a third-year elective course in the major/extended major in International Relations. It aims to advance students' knowledge about Asia-Pacific security issues and teach policy writing skills through Policy Writing Assessment (PWA).

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: academic/practitioner collaboration – interactive problem-based learning – flipped classroom – multi-modal learning activities

Pre-assigned seminar tasks to focus time in class on group work and interaction. Two specialist Writing Workshops by Public Policy practitioners to help students develop writing skills relevant to government and non-profit organisations.

Lecturer's short bio

Dr Curley is a Senior Lecturer in International relations and a member of the Higher Education Academy. She is interested in research-led learning in the undergraduate curriculum and facilitating and teaching students how to improve the flexibility of their writing for academic, government and policy environments. Dr Prudence Brown is an academic with rich practitioner experience. She adapts her professional experience to scholarly frameworks and academic debates to create learning experiences grounded in the real world. She is motivated by a love of learning and a desire to share her knowledge and experience with students and have a real impact on public sector effectiveness.

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Seminar/Workshop

  • Days and times: Wed 10am–12pm.
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 4–6, 8–10, 12
  • Location: 46–242
  • Note: Weeks 2 and 10 are Specialist Writing Workshops linked to students' policy writing assessment (PWA)

 

POLS3512 Global Media, War and Peace

Dr Sebastian Kaempf
School of Political Science and International Studies

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour lecture + 1-hour tutorial + 3-hour practical MediaLabs
  • Level: undergraduate 3rd year
  • Size: medium (approx. 60)

The course explores the transforming intersection between infotech/media and violent conflict.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: practical workshops – interactive tutorials – experiential learning – online pre-recorded lectures

Each topic of the course undergoes a particular learning cycle: the lecture opens the new topic, students then read up on the topic in preparation for the tutorial, the tutorial deepens the discussion and then students engage in a self-driven practical experiential learning activity outside contact hours. Finally, the entire course meets for a 3-hour practical MediaLab where we engage in practically 'taking the lid off' the technologies and info tech that has been at the centre of the particular topic.

Lecturer's short bio

Seb has been at UQ for 15 years. He has won UQ, national and international awards for teaching excellence and is the convener of the UQx MOOC 'Global Media, War and Technology' which addresses similar issues as the on-campus course POLS3512. He also co-convenes the podcast series 'HigherEd Heroes' which focuses on sharing best teaching practices.

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Workshop/Tutorial

  • Days and times: MediaLabs Wed 11am–2pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 5, 7, 11, 13
  • Location: 47A–341
  • Note: feel free to email Seb (s.kaempf@uq.edu.au)

Lecture

  • Days and times: Thu 2–4pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12
  • Location: 78–343
  • Note: feel free to email Seb (s.kaempf@uq.edu.au)

POLS7306 International Crisis Management

Dr Alastair Stark
School of Political Science and International Studies

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour reading group + mini-lecture
  • Level: postgraduate
  • Size: small (20–30)

An interdisciplinary course on disaster management taught to a range of disciplines (policy, international relations, development, peace and conflict, economics).

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: reading groups – student-led – minimal lecture

In this course, students teach other students via reading groups and Alastair facilitates informally via tea, coffee, biscuits and some knowledge of disaster management.

Lecturer's short bio

Alastair is a senior lecturer in public policy. He has no teaching awards – just a passion for teaching!

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Seminar

  • Days and times: Tue 5–7pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9, 10–13
  • Location: 11A–01

PUBH1103 Health Systems and Policy

A/Prof Allyson Mutch
School of Public Health

Course overview

  • Delivery: 2-hour lecture + 2-hour tutorial
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Size: large (250–300)

PUBH1103 provides a critical look at the Australian Health system and associated policy using a health equity lens. Current policy debates and complex, multidimensional 'wicked problems' are examined and critically discussed.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: interactive lectures – collaborative learning tutorials

Lectures engage students in discussion and debate and, where possible, feature community members who discuss what is happening on the ground. Tutorials emphasise the co-construction of learning, with group debate and discussion the key focus of all activities.

Lecturer's short bio

Allyson is a teaching and research-focused academic in the School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the social determinants of health and population groups experiencing disadvantage. This work carries over to her teaching where she focuses on the social determinants of health as a threshold concept and engages with student partners to help students navigate the uncertainty and discomfort that often arises when engaging with a social view of health.

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Lectorial

  • Days and times: Tue 8–10am
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9, 10–13
  • Location: 23–1
  • Note: best to contact Allyson at a.mutch@sph.uq.edu.au to discuss topics before booking.

Tutorial

  • Days and times: Wed 10am–12noon, 4–6pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9 ,10–13
  • Location: contact a.mutch@sph.uq.edu.au to attend a tutorial (Wed: 50–S201)

RBUS6901 Qualitative Business Research Methods II

Prof Jörgen Sandberg
UQ Business School

Course overview

  • Delivery: 3-hour seminar
  • Level: mainly PhDs, Honours and Masters
  • Size: small (approx. 15)

The course is directed to students who wish to develop skills in qualitative research methods for their PhD, Masters or Honours theses or Master theses.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: interactive seminars – dialogue – group work

Except for running the course on a dialogue basis, the course engages students by (a) taking point of departure in their own research project, (b) carrying out a qualitative research project from scratch, and (c) providing a seminar about a qualitative research approach.

Lecturer's short bio

Jörgen Sandberg is a professor in the UQ Business School and Co-Lead of Practice and Process Studies, a multidisciplinary research group. He has researched and published extensively in the areas of competence and learning; practice, process, sensemaking theory; theory development; philosophy of science; and research methodology.

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Interactive seminar

  • Days and times: Wed 2–5pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 2–9, 10–13
  • Location: 83–S524

 

SCIE1000 Theory & Practice in Science

Mr Andrew PentonDr Evelyne DeplazesA/Prof Barbara Maenhaut
School of Mathematics and Physics

Course overview

  • Delivery: 1-hour lecture and 2-hour workshop
  • Level: undergraduate 1st year
  • Size: large (approx. 300)

SCIE1000 introduces students to the broad range of mathematical, analytical, conceptual and computational tools employed by scientists to develop, analyse and interpret models of scientific processes.

Teaching tools and techniques

  • Keywords: active learning – interactive lectures – co-teaching

SCIE1000 is simultaneously taught by two academic staff members, one with strengths in mathematics and the other with strengths in science. This allows interaction and promotes discussions between the two staff members and the students.

Lecturer's short bio

Andrew Penton is a teaching-focused academic in the School of Mathematics and Physics who has a particular interest in approaches to teaching which help facilitate a positive learning experience for first-year students. Dr Evelyne Deplazes is a biophysical and computational chemist whose research and teaching are driven by her innate curiosity, her fascination with the molecular world and her love for solving puzzles. A/Prof Barbara Maenhaut's research interests include combinatorial design theory and graph theory. Her current research projects are in the fields of graph decompositions and Latin squares and perfect one-factorisations

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Lecture

  • Days and times: Mon 11am–12pm, Thu 12–1pm
  • 'Open' weeks: 1–6, 8–13
  • Location: Mon 63–348, Thu 80-2171 or Zoom link provided upon registration
  • Note: all classes are run in hybrid mode